Shooting rocks through 12 gauge, single barrel shotgun

Discussion in 'Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun' started by Godzilla187, Jan 22, 2018.

  1. Godzilla187

    Godzilla187 New Member

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    Hi,

    I heard survivalist Dave Canterbury briefly talk about shooting rocks as ammo in a shotgun (I'm guessing by using a muzzleloader barrel adapter for a single barrel shotgun like a Yildex TK 12 Gauge).

    Has anyone ever done this? How good are they for hunting? What types of rocks work better than others (smooth stones vs sharp rocks)?

    How many grains of black powder would you use? What type of black powder would you use?

    Sincerely,
    Godzilla187
     
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  2. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    Rocks are abrasive, lead shot isn't. Why on earth would you shoot gravel out of a perfectly good barrel and turn it into a bad barrel?

    Sure in a life or death situation it could be done but think about where you are going to get black powder, an adaptor and some percussion caps if you are lost in the woods and you've fired your last shotgun shell?
     
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  3. CCHolderinMaine

    CCHolderinMaine Garandaholic Supporting Member

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    Only in a SHTF situation. And then only as a last resort.
     
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  4. Godzilla187

    Godzilla187 New Member

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    I guess I was thinking that I could carry powder, patches and 209 primers with me and use what I have on the trail as ammo.
     
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  5. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    Not only would the gravel be abrasive but it has a much lower specific gravity, it will scatter faster and loose more energy and velocity faster and impart less energy to game than shot.

    If you want to use rocks as ammo use a sling, if you want to use a smooth bore fowler to hunt, then carry lead. Those .690 round balls can be used to make flat shot, all you have to do is pound them flat and cut them up with that knife you would or at least should be carrying.

    BTW, you need more than patches to shoot shot, you need over powder cards, wads and over shot cards otherwise your powder and shot (or gravel) will just roll out the end of the barrel if you tilt the barrel downwards.
     
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  6. jim brady

    jim brady Well-Known Member

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    I guess the point being that it is *possible* to shoot rocks from a shotgun bore - it would be a pointless exercise. As far as a SHTF or a trail/back woods survival situation, if you have room for everything you'd need to do this - why not just use that space and carry more regular ammo?
     
  7. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT No Power Options Supporting Member

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    Things get complicated when you try to be funny...........I like funny.
    Like 1,000 yard shots with the 177cal pellet rifle......
    Funny-funny-FUNNY
     
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  8. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    In a trail or backwoods long term trip situation where weight carried is an issue I'd carry a small survival type .22 and a couple hundred rounds of .22LR, it would take up much less room and weigh a lot less than a full sized scattergun and everything you'd need to use it as a muzzle loader. A .22 in the right hands with good shot placement can take a lot of game for very little expense in terms of weight or volume of things you need to carry on your back.

    Rocks do have their place in the muzzle loading world though, clamped in the top jaw of the cock. ;)
     
  9. jwdurf

    jwdurf Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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  10. Godzilla187

    Godzilla187 New Member

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    As far as my current backpacking setup goes, this is what it looks like:

    Godzilla187 Backpacking Armory https://imgur.com/a/632i2

    I was considering swapping out the Taurus Model 62 Carbine 22LR for a Yildez TK 12 Gauge or Hatfield SLG 12 Gauge. One 12 Gauge shotshell has more stopping power (man or beast) than 22 LR.

    I was wondering how well several small pebbles (Buckshot size) would work against prey.
     
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  11. jwdurf

    jwdurf Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I would think that the weight, density and possible fragility of rocks/pebbles would make them a poor choice for projectiles. Maybe up close. To me the downsides of being abrasive and having poor ballistic qualities makes it a bad choice.
     
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  12. TigerLeo

    TigerLeo Well-Known Member

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    Don't count the venerable .22 out...
    https://www.ammoland.com/2014/11/wh...n-use-to-kill-a-world-record-grizzly-in-1953/
    Now granted I get what you're saying, but in extended backpacking, survivalist situations, I'd carry a .22 over any other rifle, and then a big nasty revolver for "stopping power." Think .44 mag and above.
     
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  13. Godzilla187

    Godzilla187 New Member

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    I was trying to get into muzzleloading as a hobby. I don't like to invest a whole bunch of $$$ into muzzleloading in case I don't find it that interesting.

    Rocks seamed like a viable option. Obviously, not that arrow dynamic.

    The best homemade shotshells I've seen are shotshells packed with play dough (and dried). The ballistic results were impressive - extreme damage done to plate steel. In a survival/camping scenario, dough made from water and powdered wood bark (and possibly some sap) is definitely an idea to explore:

    Bread Dough from trees:
    https://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/survivalist/2011/11/survival-foods-can-you-really-eat-tree-bark

    Or a Grapeshot shotshell - steel snare wire with attached lead slipshot fishing weights (PMJB).
     
  14. Godzilla187

    Godzilla187 New Member

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    Thank you everyone for all your help!