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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Maybe I've been living under a rock, but I've never seen Sierra loaded handgun ammo on the shelf before. I found some Sierra Sports Master .380 90 Gr. JHP rounds at the local Academy this afternoon and I bought a box for my mom. They were $1/round, which is about standard for .380 self-defense ammo during normal times.

Anyway, these things are a two-piece case design and it appears that the barrel of the cartridge is a steel alloy because a magnet sticks to it, while the base appears to be an aluminum alloy. That struck me as extremely strange that it's apparently cheaper to design a machine to form and connect dissimilar metals than it is to extrude and form one metal into a case. Anyway, below are some pictures of the rounds. Has anyone tried these? If so, do you have any feedback? Do they feed well? :unsure:

253019

253020

253021


By the way, the Academy had this .380, numerous brands of 9mm ammo (Federal, Remington, Blazer, Fiocchi), .223/5.56, 5.45x39, 7.62x39, 7mm-08, .308/7.62x51 and even 10mm ammo. I was pleasantly surprised, although they limit you to 2 boxes. This was also at about 5 PM too, when they've likely been sitting there all day. Who knows what the truck brought in this morning that was already gone?
 

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Probably a way to put an end to reloading.

EDIT: Read the link after posting this and it says they are reloadable!!
 

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The cartridge cases called “Shell Shock” are made by a company, Shell Shock Technologies, who is independent of Sierra. The Shell Shock cartridge case has been on the market for three to four years and is reloadable but requires a special resizing die and case mouth flare die made by another independent company. At first Shell Shock cases were only offered for 9mm, and the selling point was that with the special dies the cartridge case could be reloaded many times more then conventional brass cartridge cases. A review of these cartridge cases and the special dies is by a YouTuber, Johnny’s Reloading Bench, and the title of the video review is, Shell Shock 9mm Cases +P+ Torture Test. The reviewer reloaded five cartridges eleven times at +P+ before one cartridge case failed.

As for Sierra now offering their own brand of factory loaded ammo has been about six months in production. I guess Sierra figured that they could get into a market segment to increase their overall products sales other than just bullet sales. Both Federal and Blackhills have used Sierra Match King bullets for their match rifle ammo, and also with Nosler offering their own brand of factory loaded ammo. This opens up Sierra to a larger market place then just component bullet sales considering that the vast majority of firearms owners do not load/reload their ammo. The only complaint I’ve read since Sierra is offering factory loaded ammo is from the competition shooters concerned that it could be a greater increased shortage of component match bullets. F-Class and PRS competitors send a lot of Sierra bullets down range.
 

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Apparently you need a special die set to do the reload, but it's something I'd love to try. I especially like the steel base for picking up brass - a magnet on a stick is easier than bending over or squatting (though both are excellent exercises). I followed the links in the site, and it seems that cases are only available in 9mm. Hopefully others will be shipping soon. I'm curious to learn how many loadings these cases survive, since I'm very skeptical about the wisdom of mechanically joining such dissimilar metals. I would expect the junction to corrode and weaken just due to galvanic action.
 

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I forgot to add that the Shell Shock cartridge cases are made of the body of the case is a stainless steel alloy and the cartridge cases bases is an aluminum alloy.

I do remember reading about a bi metal composite cartridge case about four years ago and the images I saw were that for various cartridges and or loadings the cartridge bases was of different colors to help designate any difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@PRR1957, I knew I had seen that case design before, but had forgotten where. That's some good info! We'll shoot a couple of magazines worth and test for function before relying on them, but I was curious if I had just missed something or if these were truly new.

I forgot to add that the Shell Shock cartridge cases are made of the body of the case is a stainless steel alloy and the cartridge cases bases is an aluminum alloy.
That's what I had guessed. The body/barrel of the case is mildly magnetic as I checked with a magnetic pickup tool. The base looks very much like aluminum and isn't attracted by the magnet.
 

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Apparently you need a special die set to do the reload, but it's something I'd love to try. I especially like the steel base for picking up brass - a magnet on a stick is easier than bending over or squatting (though both are excellent exercises). I followed the links in the site, and it seems that cases are only available in 9mm. Hopefully others will be shipping soon. I'm curious to learn how many loadings these cases survive, since I'm very skeptical about the wisdom of mechanically joining such dissimilar metals. I would expect the junction to corrode and weaken just due to galvanic action.
Go to YouTube and watch the video I posted the channel and video title of in my first reply.
 

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The reloading dies for the Shell Shock unit are made by LEE and sales for around $85.99. The company claims the cases can be reloaded 11 times, but of course YMMV. The cases have been tested to 70,000 p.s.i. Looks like it can be a real winner.

Larry
 

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Some years ago I watched a video made by the developer of the Shell Shock cases. He loaded and fired one case over and over and over and...you get the point. If I recall, he made it to 35 reloads before failure....not failure of the case, failure of his video equipment. The battery died. Who knows how long he could have gone, as he was loading standard pressures. Fire, wipe the case down, reload, fire, repeat. That said...the cases were about half the price of new brass, but the dies were twice the price....they use a spring loaded "pushed" to push the cases out of the die, as a regular die would likely pull the case components apart. Seems that interest died fairly quickly, though the commitment was to expand from 9mm to all other modern handgun calibers.

EDIT: Reviewed S3 Reload page to confirm that they made it to 32 reloads before the battery died. S3 Shellshock NAS3 Case Firing/Reloading
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Seems that interest died fairly quickly, though the commitment was to expand from 9mm to all other modern handgun calibers.
I think they've done that for the auto loaders. Sierra has an offering from .380 to .45 ACP with those cases now.
 

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I think they've done that for the auto loaders. Sierra has an offering from .380 to .45 ACP with those cases now.
Sierra is kind of the new kid on the block as for their own brand of factory loaded ammo, so using the Shell Shock cartridge cases is a good move for them in that they don’t have to compete for brass cartridge cases.

Personally I kind of like the modular cartridge case design. The design is that the stainless steel cartridge case body has a tube formed at what would be the case web. The tube passes through the cartridge aluminum case base which the tube is flared out to form a flange which then secures to two components together. The flanged tube is also the primer flash hole. The only possible problem I can foresee is the cartridge case body loosened from the base by being fead in pistol that has a steep feed ramp. Only time will prove if this a good cartridge case design. The only YouTube test I’ve seen so far is from johnny’sroadingbecnch.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sierra is kind of the new kid on the block as for their own brand of factory loaded ammo, so using the Shell Shock cartridge cases is a good move for them in that they don’t have to compete for brass cartridge cases.

Personally I kind of like the modular cartridge case design. The design is that the stainless steel cartridge case body has a tube formed at what would be the case web. The tube passes through the cartridge aluminum case base which the tube is flared out to form a flange which then secures to two components together. The flanged tube is also the primer flash hole. The only possible problem I can foresee is the cartridge case body loosened from the base by being fead in pistol that has a steep feed ramp. Only time will prove if this a good cartridge case design. The only YouTube test I’ve seen so far is from johnny’sroadingbecnch.....
I watched his torture video. That's pretty impressive performance! For my purposes here, it looks like the rounds are fine. They won't be reloaded.
 
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