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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I am new to this forum as a participant but I have enjoyed reading discussions for some time. There is a tremendous amount of knowledge in the brains of a lot of you guys floating around so I thought I might extract some. I have a confusing firearm to discuss. I realize pictures are a must, so I will include as many as they will allow. It is a S&W revolver, 45 cal, marked model 1955 on the barrel. The S/N # is S 114###.
From my reading, this revolver is supposed to be a 45 acp ( to use with moon clips or AR rounds) but this is simply not possible. The acp rounds fall into the cylinder and with moon clips, the cylinder will not close.
you can see by the pics that the cylinder has a “step“ recessed to hold in a round. I tried a 45 colt round and it fits perfect........ hence the confusion. There are some numbers and a couple letters stamped in behind cylinder when you swing it out. I have not shot this yet because I want to make sure of the correct rounds to use. My confusion lies with what I have? I have read that in the model 1955 there were a handful of firearms made for 45 colt and they are very rare and being stamped just like the regular acp firearms, But they do exist (I’ve read). I know many were modified to shoot 45 colt. Either way, I will give this the utmost respect when firing. Any input would help.
 

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Looks like you found one of the rarer ones that were chambered in 45colt. Rumor has it that there were a few that had two cylinder and crane assemblies, 45acp/45colt. someone will be along shortly that will KNOW the details. Congratulations, that’s a fine revolver.
 

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I am not an expert in anything. It looks like .45 Colt to me. All I have to go by is the .45 Cal stamped on the barrel and the way the cylinder is made, looks like a .45 will slip right down into that and the rim will be held properly in its "cutout". Something that puzzles me is the things that look like cracks, on the fourth picture, between each chamber in the cylinder. I wish that third picture was not as blurry as it is when enlarged.

. . . by the way, you can add as many pictures as you want, you are just not allowed more that ten per post.
 

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Something that puzzles me is the things that look like cracks, on the fourth picture, between each chamber in the cylinder.
I could be missing something (entirely possible), but I think you're referring to the gap where the ejector engages the cylinder.
 

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Maybe, I am talking about where I have (kinda) circled on this picture. I look at my revolvers and don't see anything like this:
I think it's the ejector. There should be another line that runs radially (red line) to the cylinder cartridge wall along the ejector, but with tighter tolerances that might not show up in the picture. I could be wrong.

249642
 

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OK, I will buy that!! I just never paid any attention to them being that deep.
 

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The cylinder should have the last three digits of the serial number stamped on it, if it left the factory as a .45 Colt.
 

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In the OP's 4th picture what I see looks like severe cracks between the chambers. They may be reflections, shadows, or something like that. But to me they look like cracks bad enough to render the cylinder useless. I didn't notice until George pointed them out. It is his fault.lol
 

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In the OP's 4th picture what I see looks like severe cracks between the chambers. They may be reflections, shadows, or something like that. But to me they look like cracks bad enough to render the cylinder useless. I didn't notice until George pointed them out. It is his fault.lol
Naw too straight and uniform in each cylinder. It’s the extractor.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey guys, there NOT cracks, I’ve included a couple of pics. Thanks for the input though........
which brings me back to my original question. Does anyone know by looking at pics what it is or could be? thanks
 

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It is the extractor that is giving some concern. I have a 28-2 that has a 1955 barrel and has been converted to 45 colt. My cylinder looks the same. Don
 
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I believe it is a model 1955 target 45. I am not an expert but I believe that the standard configuration was 45acp with the cylinder milled to accommodate the use of moon clips. There were some, perhaps as few as 200, that were chambered for 45 Colt from the factory. If factory original, not modified, it should be more valuable than your average bear?
Where’s Alpo when you need him?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
No worries, also the S/N # is lower than any I’ve seen before which throws a twist in there.
 

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Where’s Alpo when you need him?
From the Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson, 3rd edition.

Reported that around 15 were made in .45 Colt; we’re aware of one that has surfaced. Perhaps five times standard value.
Serial number range is S143XXX - S333454, and continued with the “N” serial prefix in 1969
 

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There was a cartridge - the .45 Auto Rim - that was designed for revolvers chambered in .45 ACP. The rim did away with the need for half moon clips. It was simply a rimmed .45 ACP.

I have no idea what caliber your pistol is. Could be a .45 Colt. Only way for me to tell for sure would be to drop one of those into the cylinder. If your's doesn't function with .45 ACPs and half moon clips - I'm guessing either .45 Colt or .45 Auto Rim.

Alpo jumped in as I typed this and entered. He knows what he is talking about.
 

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The cylinder looks long enough for the 45 Colt looking at the picture. I would give Smith & Wesson a call. If it's the 45 Colt keep it. It's worth a lot of money.
 

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Measuring the cylinder would get us closer to an answer, since you don't want to give a serial number call Smith and Wesson or search yourself here:
 
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