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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
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Three very common types of "Mountain Man" knives.
All three here , while not from the "Rendezvous Period" ( circa 1825 - 1840ish )...
Are from the 1890's - 19teens.
All three get used today as hunting , camping and kitchen knives.

The bottom two are what are referred to as "Butchers" in Fur Trade ledgers and Journals.
The large one is a Russel "Green River".
The Middle knife is a Christopher & Johnson from Sheffield England...I won this knife at a rifle match and as it did not have a handle , I made one from cow horn.

The top knife is what was called a "Trade Knife" or at times a "Scalper" in period Journals and Ledgers.
It was made by "Universal"
The original wooden handle broke...so I made a handle from antler.
Andy
 

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For 25 years I carried one that seems to be about the size of the middle one. Still have it...and I had to put scales on it also but I did plain ol' wood. More cool stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #3
For 25 years I carried one that seems to be about the size of the middle one. Still have it...and I had to put scales on it also but I did plain ol' wood. More cool stuff
Thanks.
That middle one is a great size and shape for sure....it has a 5 1/2 inch blade.
I thought about a wood handle....but....I didn't have a horn handle knife and just happened to have a small cow horn nearby...
I think it turned out well.
Andy
 

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Nice collection! Wasn't there something said about the Green River knives? I faintly recall that when a knife was sunk in all of the way - wasn't it said that the knife 'went all the way to Green River'? I presume that it meant that the knife went in all the way to the 'Green River' maker's mark. Just a worthless bit of trivia.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice collection! Wasn't there something said about the Green River knives? I faintly recall that when a knife was sunk in all of the way - wasn't it said that the knife 'went all the way to Green River'? I presume that it meant that the knife went in all the way to the 'Green River' maker's mark. Just a worthless bit of trivia.
"Up to the Green River" was a common late period "Mountain Man" slang term....
It meant doing something well...or in a grimmer sense , it meant to stick an enemy with the knife , till you hit the logo marking , near the hilt of the knife.
Andy
 

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And from what I recall, if it's correct, the "GR" on the knife blades didn't mean Green River, it stood for "Georgius Rex", King George of England where the trade knives were made.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
And from what I recall, if it's correct, the "GR" on the knife blades didn't mean Green River, it stood for "Georgius Rex", King George of England where the trade knives were made.
The "GR" did indeed stand for "Georgius Rex" , that was stamped on many a English made knife.
Mine is indeed a Russel "Green River" knife ....
Says so on the blade....:)
Andy
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Aw crap, that's right too. I forgot about Russell Green River works. I'm entitled...it's been 20 years since I did any mountain man events....lol!
 

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Aw crap, that's right too. I forgot about Russell Green River works. I'm entitled...it's been 20 years since I did any mountain man events....lol!
No worries....
I often think about the "Hereafter"...as in :
When I wander in a room , I wonder what am I here after...? :D
Andy
 
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