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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was sizing and priming 9mm brass today when the press locked up because the primer did not seat all the way. So I gave it a good lick and still the primer would not seat. I removed the shell plate, took out the offending brass and put it to one side. I've had that happen on rare occasions when a primer somehow gets sideways so I thought that was the cause.

A few minutes later the press locked up again because a primer had not seated correctly. I took this one out and looked at the headstamp it was "WCC 10" with a NATO "+". The first one had the same headstamp.

So I started looking at headstamps and found two more WCC 10's. I put them in the press and tried to prime them one at a time. The primer would not seat in either one. Even with a considerable downward force they would not seat all the way and just deformed. I sorted though the brass and found several more with the 10 and put them aside.

I tried some brass marked "WCC 12" with the NATO "+" and it primed just fine. It was only the cases that had a 10 that were screwed up. I think the 10 means they were made in 2010.

If you come across any of those I suggest you put them in the scrap bucket. A couple of pictures are attached.
 

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same way you do it when loading 1 round.

you use your ream tool to cut out the primer rimp. OR if you are rich enough and have the swage tool, you swage out the crimp.

yes it's .. 'hand work'

much of the military brass you find will have crimped primers. some more than others.

on my lyman case prep station .. it , like many auto stations ) has 5 heads. I have a primer reamer, primer pocket truer, primer pocket leaner, and a mouth ID and OD trimmer. I switch out the 3 primer pocket tools depending on if working on L or S primer.
 

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Any military brass - rifle or pistol - 9, 45, 38 - first time I load it I swage it. Also CCI Blazer Brass and S&B. Sometimes I feel a cri p going aay. Sometimes I don't. But I do it all the first time, and there is never any trouble priming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've loaded over 2,000 9mm rounds and probably have another 2,000 cases that I've sized and primed and are ready to load. I have not reamed any pockets and none have caused any priming problems until now.

I went back and inspected about 1,000 rounds that I have primed and did not find any with the WCC 10 headstamp. There are a lot (maybe 100 or so) with the WCC 12 headstamp. It seems reasonable to assume that at least some of them are once fired and none of them have given me any problems. So it seems that only the WCC 10s have the crimped primer.

It would be a daunting task to ream every primer pocket on that many cases. So I believe I will sort though them and discard any with the WCC 10 headstamp.
 

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Don't scrap them. It's not as painstaking as you think. Take a countersink and chuck it up in a drill press or hand drill. You'll be done in no time. Or you can use you case mouth deburring tool. With 100 cases, you'll be done in no time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Don't scrap them. It's not as painstaking as you think. Take a countersink and chuck it up in a drill press or hand drill. You'll be done in no time. Or you can use you case mouth deburring tool. With 100 cases, you'll be done in no time.
If you use a drill press and countersink how do you keep from making the primer pocket too large?
 

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And that is why I swage. Comes out the same size every time. Never too big, never too small.
 

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I did the same last nite. With the same brand.
 

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this is why i havent pitched the jillions of nato brass i have. at this point i dont have the time or need to do all the prep work needed to use. plenty of non nato on hand. but if i cannot get non nato, i will take the time to make the nato work.
 

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No, I've never heard of anyone reaming or swaging 9mm brass.
Military brass has primers crimped in place. Common knowledge that crimp must be removed before seating new primer. Also mentioned in most of my reloading manuals. I've "de-crimped" many, many primer pockets with a simple countersink (5.56/.223, 9mm, 45 ACP). If you use common sense and not bear down with all your strength on the countersink, you won't take out "too much" metal. If you don't need a super fast semi-auto de-crimping set up, do them by hand. Brass in one hand, counter sink in the other. Insert c'sink into the primer pocket, twist twice applying moderate pressure. Visually inspect primer pocket to see if crimp completely removed. Easy to see, just gotta look...
 

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It would be a daunting task to ream every primer pocket on that many cases. So I believe I will sort though them and discard any with the WCC 10 headstamp.
you must be rich / well off to casually discard cases instead of touching them a few seconds.

wish I had that kind of money.

I bet you half my rifle brass is crimped primer stuff. I know virtually ALL my 3006 is and looking lik most of my 223 is as well.

just one more step in the cleaning prep center. probably adds a few seconds to the cycle per case.
 

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If you use a drill press and countersink how do you keep from making the primer pocket too large?
You're not boring the pocket out, just removing that little bit of ring crimp. You're not changing the diameter or depth of the pocket.
 

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yep.. the countersink face is at an angle and it will contact the crimp before he tip of the CS hits the base of the flashhole.

all it needs to do is remove the lip of the crimp
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I spent most of yesterday sorting a 5 gallon bucket of 9mm brass and pulling out all the ones with a NATO headstamp. There were about 300 with dates ranging from 1991 to 2012. It looked like about half of them had reamed pockets. The ones dated 2010 had the most pronounced crimp and none of them had been reamed.

I could not find a countersink so I chucked up a 3/8" bit in my drill press and reamed six of them. I haven't tried priming them yet to see how effective that was, but it looks like the crimp is gone. I'm not sure 3/8" is the right size to use - anybody ever reamed with a drill bit? If so what is the best size to use?
 
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