Steaming out dings...

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics Forum' started by cointoss2, Mar 4, 2003.

  1. cointoss2

    cointoss2 Guest

    polishshooter
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    (4/10/02 10:20:54 pm)
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    Hey guys, how do YOU go about raising dings on stocks you are refinishing?

    I've been doing it for 20 years with varying degrees of success, with the wet rag/hot iron method, sometimes they pop right up, sometimes I get so much steam going in the house it looks like fog and they don't budge, no rhyme or reason, either...sometimes BIG ones come up better than small ones...

    I was wondering if any of you guys have a better way...

    I used to use the wet rag, but lately I have been using a soaked piece of Bounty, seems to hold more water, thus more steam...

    BUT I guess my question is, do you soak the STOCK first, and steam out the moisture within? Or use the steam from the rag? And do you do it BEFORE you rough sand, or after??? I usually do it after I get the finish stripped, and the stock rough sanded with 60 grit...

    The reason is tonight I am working on a really decent M44 stock that is coming out really nice EXCEPT for a large ding on the side where it looks like the rifle must have fallen against something like a dull blade...the grain is not cut, but it's a fairly deep "slash", about an inch long, maybe 1/8" wide, maybe 1/8" deep...it's up about half way, but will not budge any more....


    Maybe there's a better way....



    "Don't hear him call you an ---hole, hear WHY he's calling you an ---hole." -------- From "A Season on the Brink"

    Moskovskyya
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    (4/10/02 10:34:25 pm)
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    Polish, I think you're doing all you can do. Some of the deep ones that won't raise, or are to deep to sand out only leave 2 alternatives. #1 leave it as is, and call it a "character" dent, or #2, route it out and do an arsenal repair by replacing the section / area where the dent / damage is located.

    I done both, it just depends. I keep old un repairable stocks in my junk box. When an area needs to be replaced, it's kind of interesting to look through the scraps to find the right piece of wood that has matchng grain, remove the old, and perfectly refit the replacement with a professional looking job. That kind of thing to me is as satisfying as a good refinish a worthy stock.





    polishshooter
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    (4/10/02 11:03:47 pm)
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    'Character Dent," I like that... I've called then "History Dings" before too....but usually only on my "ratty" 91/30s...the post war 44s probably just fell over in the guard shack when the conscript owner was drunk on guard duty...

    Yeah, I have even chiseled and rasped gouges out, actually reshaping the stock a little, and when you finished up you would never notice unless it was held next to an original, but I hate doing that except as a last resort...

    Well, I better go sand it and see what it looks like.
    "Don't hear him call you an ---hole, hear WHY he's calling you an ---hole." -------- From "A Season on the Brink"

    LIKTOSHOOT
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    (4/10/02 11:26:28 pm)
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    Try lemon juice in the dent, then steam.....no not that bottled crap. Smells good too! LTS
    T.F.F.

    AntiqueDr
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    (4/11/02 4:59:29 am)
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    ezSupporter
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    If the wood fibers have been damaged rather than just bent, the dent may not come out. The traditional method is to remove the old finish (not absolutely necessary with oil finishes but mandatory with lacquers), place the just-barely-more-than-damp rag on the spot then apply the heat source. May take several applications.
    We Buy Guns! 1 - 100, Antique or Modern!
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    polishshooter
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    (4/11/02 10:22:02 am)
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    Well, I got it up most of the way after a couple of HOURs, then took my trusty wood chisel and shaved and scraped the edges, then bastard filed then some 40 grit paper...and Voila!

    No gouge...and you can't tell I "operated" there either...finish sanded and stained it last night and am getting ready for first coat of TruOil right now...

    At this point, this baby MAY be a keeper stock...it's looking good.

    One other trick I've found...if you get a ding or small gouge you can't get out at all, scrape the old finish out of the "hole" with a sharp knife blade or edge of a chisel, even if it seems to make the hole bigger...and if you stain it a dark walnut, it hides them pretty well, most of the time can ony find by "touch" when finished...and the stock comes out looking like a "stock" Polish hardwood....

    If you don't, then you get all those darker "dots" on the stock that the stain just makes darker....

    You guys probably already knew that, but thought I would share...some of these stocks look like they are a lost cause when I start though, and come out pretty nice, even if time consuming...
    "Don't hear him call you an ---hole, hear WHY he's calling you an ---hole." -------- From "A Season on the Brink"

    polishshooter
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    (4/11/02 11:30:13 am)
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    Ahhh...Happiness is TruOil sticky fingers on the keyboard, and finding that the drips that missed the paper landed on the brown design part of the throw rug so the wife will never notice....
    "Don't hear him call you an ---hole, hear WHY he's calling you an ---hole." -------- From "A Season on the Brink"

    Flhunter
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    (4/11/02 2:53:37 pm)
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    Quote:
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    One other trick I've found...if you get a ding or small gouge you can't get out at all, scrape the old finish out of the "hole" with a sharp knife blade or edge of a chisel, even if it seems to make the hole bigger...and if you stain it a dark walnut, it hides them pretty well, most of the time can Sony find by "touch" when finished...and the stock comes out looking like a "stock" Polish hardwood....
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    No, I never knew that. I guess the trick here is in using the "Dark Walnut stain". I've done just the opposite. When it came to the deep ding/dents where the fiber of the wood has been damaged, I figured that the cosmo and grease is too deeply routed in. I would try to avoid these spots when finishing with the stain to help them blend in better. I will definitely try your little trick as I hate to see them dark spots in a stock. Thanks!!






    The Curio and Relic Firearms Forum

    wundudnee
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    Posts: 15
    (4/12/02 3:25:18 am)
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    polishshooter,
    I have found that if you clean wood with a weak bleach solution before you apply the stain it will even out a lot of the hard to stain spots and the darker spots.

    If you take a piece of single strength glass and break it on a flat spot you will have excellent multi shaped scrapers. The glass has a wire edge that scrapes really well. Also a lot of finish carpenters carry an old plane blade. They work well.

    If you get a dent that you have to fill, you can use a exacto knife or a pocket knife to cut little grain marks across the patch before you stain the stock. This works especially well on walnut or similiar grained woods.

    I have worked in power houses and a boiler plant for several years so getting steam was never a problem. I would just hang the stock up out in the area and turn live steam on it. If it took several hours that was alright, I had to be there anyway. That would raise the grain some and that broken glass would take off the feather. A coat of finish and rub with 0000 steelwool, repeat, repeat, repeat until you get bored or satisfied.

    Some of the stocks I refinished were kind of like polishing a pig. They nearly always looked better than when I started.

    wundudnee

    polishshooter
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    (4/12/02 11:30:45 am)
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    Wdee, ain't that the truth!

    "...until you are bored or satisfied..."

    Yeah, MOST times they look better when finished, especially the ones in worst shape when started...

    But I've had a few "iffy" ones, where they weren't TOO bad before I started, that I decided maybe a little sanding would make PERFECT, that after I was finished I wasn't too sure it actually was better than it was...just shinier...especially when you find all those dings and blemishes in the white that you didn't know were there with the stain on it...

    Sometimes I think I might be better just cleaning good and reoiling on those...

    And question for you too...lots of guys say "just light sanding..."

    MOST of the time I start with 40 or 60 grit and it's FAR from "light sanding..." (Especially the ratty ones...)

    Is that your experience?


    "Don't hear him call you an ---hole, hear WHY he's calling you an ---hole." -------- From "A Season on the Brink"

    wundudnee
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    (4/13/02 3:45:02 am)
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    If I'm starting on some collectable Winchester I might just try to clean it up with very very light abrasive or steel wool then evening out the original finish with some light staining or Formbys or such. A good heavy coat of wax- done.

    Then again I've been known to go to the barn for the hoof rasp. You can take out some pretty bad places if you feather it out far enough.

    The hardest thing I have to think about is trying to stay away from original guns that I know would look nicer refinished. But you know what you hear if you start on something like that.

    polishshooter
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    (4/13/02 8:16:47 pm)
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    Finished up a Polish M44 stock last night, and it just may be the prettiest one I've done...put the rifle back together and it was kind of a shame, the finish on the metal is like 30%, that baby needs an all matching 95%...two coats of walnut stain, 3 coats of TruOil, with 0000 rubbing between coats, smoother than smooth, grain looks better than when I started the finish....and I usually rub down with wool when I'm done to cut the shine a little, this one I left shiny, it's nice...

    I may just have to put one of my decent keeper Poles in it and keep it...but then THEY have decent stocks too...one still stock with neat markings, HHHMmmm...

    Crap, maybe I did this one TOO good...
    "Don't hear him call you an ---hole, hear WHY he's calling you an ---hole." -------- From "A Season on the Brink"