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Stevens Favorite pistol

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by kross, Apr 9, 2009.

  1. kross

    kross New Member

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    I have a couple of Stevens Favorite Model 94 .22s that were once my father's. He acquired them in the early 1940s as a boy.
    One is a Stevens Favorite .22 pistol. Nine inch barrel--6 inch octagonal, 3 inch round. The sight folds up and down. Immediately to the rear of the sight on the top of the octagonal is the J. Stevens A&T Co. stamp. The .22-Long Rifle stamp is on the surface of the octagonal immediately counter-clockwise (looking forward from the breech) from the Co. stamp. Serial number under the lever is X 753.
    I also have have a Stevens Favorite Model 94 .22 rifle. Standard octagonal/round barrel. Rear sight is fixed. Immediately clockwise from the top of the octagonal is the J. Stevens A&T Co. stamp. Immedately counter-clockwise is the .22-Long Rifle stamp. Serial number under the lever is N 1.
    Can anybody give me any insights into what I have here?
     

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  2. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

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    Yes. You have a nice old boy's rifle, and a felony.
     

  3. kross

    kross New Member

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    Pistol is nonfunctional.
     
  4. 22WRF

    22WRF Well-Known Member

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    Doesn't make any difference it could be made functional
     
  5. kross

    kross New Member

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    Looking for insight--so thanks for providing it. I'll take appropriate action regarding it. Any thoughts regarding the N 1 serial number on the rifle?
     
  6. FTK87

    FTK87 New Member

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    I'm just curious, why is the pistol a felony? pardon my ignorance.
     
  7. RJay

    RJay Well-Known Member

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    During that era many of the gun companys would produce guns in batches. They would start with A1 and when that series was finished they would start with B1 . the N-1 would be the first rifle built in the 14th run. Useless for dating becasue they may have more than one series made in a year, Your rifle looks to be a very nice Model 17 Favorite. The pistol looks to have started life as a Model 17 also. Your rifle looks to be in good shape, the rifles value , perhaps 300 to 350. ( every thing is going up) That home made pistol looks like it would be a load of fun to shoot. If it's not funtional, it's still ilegal but I would think they would have better things to do. other than breaking down your door for a broken .22. Could be wrong, been wrong before and I bercha I will be wrong again.
     
  8. trickyrick

    trickyrick Member

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    ftk, law states once a rifle always a rifle. you can not have a rifle w/ a barrel less than 16" w/ an over all length of 26" if i recall correctly. it is considered a sbr, (short barreled rifle). i can't recall if you can get a license to own a sbr or not. someone will chime in i,m sure. you can make a pistol into a rifle but not the other way around, and in most cases, iirc, if you make a rifle out of a pistol, i don't think you can make it back into a pistol. there are exceptions to some grandfathered weapons and thompson contender like weapons also, i think. you can also make a new reciever and then pistol would be ok.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2009
  9. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

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    It is illegal to cut a rifle barrel to less than 16", or shorten a rifle to less than 26" OAL, unless a proper federal tax stamp has been obtained prior to the modification.
     
  10. FTK87

    FTK87 New Member

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    ok, thanks for the 411
     
  11. NZEF1945

    NZEF1945 New Member

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    I came across this site by accident and have registered simply to put in my one cents worth about Stevens Favourite rifles.
    They were made as the result of a Patent by Horr in 1885. The first rifle was the Model 1889 and it came out in two sizes - the large frame sideplate called the Ideal and the small frame sideplate called the Favorite - it is the Favorite we shall concern ourselves with. There were only 1500 or so sideplate Favorites ever made. In 1894 the sideplate was done away with and the solid frame Model 1894 came out. Between 1894 and about 1902 I have worked out 14 alterations in the design - including lower tang lengthened, Spring changed from not being screwed in but merely forced against a 'capstan' to one which was screwed into place, several major external visible changes and internal changes to the receiver, change in thickness of receiver, change in profile of barrel shank in the receiver ring, change in breech block tightening system, change from side ejector to middle ejector, change in ejectors, Slight change in profile of breech block, change in breechblock and lever at pivot from side ejector to middle ejector.
    The 1889 through 1894 rifles all had part octagon and part round barrels. In 1912 this was changed to either a full round or a full octagon barrel. In 1915 the 1912 was revamped and called the Model 1915 and stamped as such on the upper tang.
    These rifles came out in .22 and .25RF as well as .32RF.
    The standard rifle was the number 17 but you could also get a number 18 or a number 19 - the differences were in the type of sightas they had so in fact you could replace the sights of a Number 17 with number 18 sights and no one would ever know the difference.
    The Favorite also came out as a Number 21 - this is rather interesting because the Number 21 was initially a bicycle rifle with 20 inch barrel but the later Number 21 was the ladies rifle and different.
    Now the reason for joining the forum - you CANNOT age Favorites by the serial numbers. The first favorites were numbered contemporary with all others Stevens rifles so that rifle number 404xx which I own here is one of the very first 1894s ever made - it has 14 differences to any other Favorite I have ever seen - it has a five digit serial number - they then went to a letter preceding a number up to a three digit number. On another forum I saw a fellow claimed to have one of the very first Favorites ever made because its serial number was A 58. No one knows what order the letters were assigned but they were not assigned in alphabetical order so that M 67 could have been made before A 38.
    It is thought that the numbering system was assigned arbitrarily to confuse competitors as to how many were being made but due to the fact that the records were mysteriously burnt or otherwise destroyed the reason could well be more sinister but it did no favours for historians and those interested in Stevens Favorite rifles.
    A final point - markings - if you come up with a Favorite with both receiver AND barrel marked it is most likely made up out of parts, if you come across one with no markings at all then it is not a scarce one which missed out on being marked - it has been made up of parts. EITHER the barrel OR the receiver was marked but not both.
    Barrel markings might be without a wee sort of Maltese cross at either end of the markings, the markings might be on the top barrel flat or on the right hand barrel flat. If on the right hand barrel flat then they might be one way up so that they had to be read by looking over the top OR they could be the other way up so had to be read from the right hand side. If on the receiver they might be on the top and read from the left hand side and the top markings could be one of three different markings - one variation is merely a large FAVORITE, the others have full details. The markings could also be on the left hand barrel flat but these are relatively unusual.

    Well folks I hope that helps all of those of you who like and collect Stevens Favorites.

    I have many hundreds of guns from an original Model 19212 TSMG through to Sharps, Spencer, Whitney Kenndy, Colts etc and including many Favorites so have gleaned this from observation over forty years, Bill West's book 'Stevens and Savage' and a great deal of research.
    Out of the hundreds of guns I have I have always had a soft spot for the Stevens Favorites and on my farm regularly sit outside the house shooting Favorites in .32 and .25 as I have many boxes of ammunition for them yet...great wee rifles to shoot!
     
  12. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    G'day Neighbour , Welcome to the forum ! why not make a post so it dont get mixed with this one and other will be able to reference it easy .. where trying to build up a knowledge base and it all helps , this is good info cheers sport!
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2011
  13. NZEF1945

    NZEF1945 New Member

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    Thanks for the friendly welcome - I might just be passing through and may never find the site again as I only came on to put my one cents worth in but do like the forum - its just that computers and me arent good friends - Now I wouldnt know how to start off a post or anything like that - they call it technologically impaired - Im a relic of the days when telephones had handles to spin around and you had an endearing conversation with the lady at the telephone exchange for ten minutes before she put you through.
    If someone wanted to use the information to begin a thread then thats good by me...the two most misundertood firearms in the world and most complex as far as knowledge and variations are concerned are the Stevens Favorites and the exposed hammer Winchester pump action .22 cal rifles though the latter have more write ups and records than the Favorites. Even then there are Winchester pump actions that are a bit of a mystery - for example there are either 262 or 362 original factory assembled Model 62A Winchesters made using Model 62 barrels and Model 1890 receivers and in the very high 849,999 to low 850,000 serial number range - a disproportionate number of these came to New Zealand as I have turned up four of them. They are all original as testified by P through a W in an oval proof mark for factory assembled on both receiver and barrel (Barrels supplied for assembly out of factory had only a P in an oval) - Model 1890 receivers were used twice in the history of Model 62 rifles - when they changed from the new modified locking mechanism of the earlier 62s and prior to 1939 and also at parts clean up at end of production. I think that most of the pre 1939 ones came to NZ and the end of year production ones were sold in the US.

    As can be seen the study of Stevens Favorites and Winchester pump actions is a very complex study indeed.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2011