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I have a gun with " Modell 1903 " stamped on top of the receiver and " STEYR 1911 " on the left side of the action. The serial number given is 9638 and it is on the right side I the receive and then again at the base I the barrel also on the right side. The stock is not original, I dont believe, but was done very nicely by someone with a lot of patience and potential skill. Any advice or info as to the make, model and value?
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Ain't that one to make you scratch your head. The marking "Steyr 1911" on the left of the receiver really throws me for a loop. I believe what you have is a significantly modified 1903 Mannlicher/Schoenauer. If it is indeed a 1903 it should be in 6.5 X 54 M/S cartridge. It looks to me as if the bolt handle has been completely changed and as you noted, obviously restocked by someone with perhaps potential talent. It's pretty rough looking to me.

I think Steyr also manufactured the Greek military 1903 and I'm fairly confident there was a maker for the Greeks in Breda? I am assuredly unfamiliar with the military version of the 1903 M/S so it's entirely possible yours is a sporterized version of that rifle. No doubt Marblekonus information will be much more accurate than mine and hopefully he will see this thread and offer his opinion.

Pull the barreled action from the stock and there should be proof marks on the bottom of the barrel just in front of the receiver. They will tell the real story if still present.
 

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Thank you. I believe you are correct about the caliber, I was told it was a 6.5 x something, but the cartridge was practically reload only. I don't know if it would make a difference in the identification, but it also came with a side-moumy scope that was pretty old and dusty. And as you could see the modifier of the gun drilled holes for the mount on the action. The magazine also appears to be the spiral fee

Feed that I read about when researching it.

A few more pictures
 

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If it's 6.5 X 54 M/S factory ammo is available I'm certain. Ah, yes. Graf's has what is evidently house branded ammo and I know there's others out there. I've been handloading so long I never think of factory ammo.

http://www.ammunitiontogo.com/index.php/cName/rifle-ammo-65x54-mannlicher-sch

Scoping a M/S has always been a challenge because of the open rear receiver bridge and there is/was several means of doing so, yours is one of the more popular and common and certainly adequate. It really doesn't aid in identification as most were done post manufacture.

The magazine is the reason for half the name of the rifle. It was developed by Otto Schoenauer and I forget the date. The rotary magazine is a bit persnickety in the ammo it will feed and requires the correct bullet length and shape to operate smoothly. Nearly all 156 to 160 gr. round nose ammo will cycle like hot butter through it. The M/S action has the reputation of being the smoothest bolt rifle ever made and from my two examples I have to concur.

Regardless of whether your rifle is a re-worked 1903 sporter or a converted Greek 1903 you certainly have a good using rifle provided it is in good condition. The 6.5 X 54 loaded with 140 to 160 gr. bullets is adequate for anything in the lower 48 save the big bears. I prefer the 160 Hornady round nose because it's just right and was the original bullet weight....well, 156 gr. was the actual, original weight but who splitting hairs over 4 grains...lol! However, "back in its day" the 6.5 X 54 accounted for its share of polar bears and moose and W.D.M. Bell used it successfully on elephant. The exceptionally long for caliber, 160 gr. round nose penetrates like a fence post.
 
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Thank you for the news on the ammo, I'll definitely take your advice as to the Hornady 160 gr....
 

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Marble, thanks for that!! How ignorant I am of the Greek M/S rifles is that I thought Breda was a town in Greece, not a maker in Italy....:oops: I also had no idea that was the original bolt handle....:confused: It greatly resembles the mid/late-50's Steyr, M/S rifle bolt handles with that backward sweep.

Mikul, I know there is other makers of 6.5 X 54 ammo. A search should turn them up. I think Hornady even loads it from time to time and I'm equally certain Norma loads it. I want to say Prvi Partizan and Sellior & Belloit also load it.

The value of original, un-altered, 1903 Mannlicher/Schoenaur sporting rifles in good to very good condition starts around $2,000. The better, more original the condition the more they bring...as if that isn't stating the obvious. Sporterized Greek 1903's if well done might fetch $500-$600. Consider that this is just my opinion and worth what you paid for it, I'd guess yours around $300. Depending on what scope you have with it maybe $400. As with any firearm viewed on the internet it's difficult to say and especially a sporterized surplus military rifle. If you like it, it doesn't matter, it's still one of the finest bolt actions ever made and in an excellent cartridge. If you're a hunter/shooter I think you'll develop a fondness for the 6.5 X 54 M/S. It isn't as hot as the 6.5 X 55 Swede but in the hunting fields will do anything the Swede will. 6.5 is just a good caliber. The Europeans knew that long ago and it took the US 90 years to learn that.
 

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Thank you both for all the valuable information, and help in identifying the gun.... I do believe I will hang on to it and see about getting some ammo for a day at the range. It's not worth enough to make me consider selling it, and it isn't too often you stumble across something this beautiful. Until next time, be safe and many thanks.
--Mikul
 
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