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I think that's an antique but boy, I do not recognize that stamp. I also wonder about the front ramrod thimble. I think it's period but I don't know if it's original. Kind of a neat lookin' piece.
 

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I don't recognize the hallmark and the lock appears to have been converted from flint to percussion. Like Sharps, I have my doubts about the ram rod, entry thimble and ram rod pipe being original to the gun. Is this another Colonial piece from India?
Edit- After blowing up the image I do see signs of a forced patina on the lock and bolster and I don't see signs of it being a forge welded wrought iron barrel. I'd want to do a hands on inspection before I'd want to spend any money on it. I think I know what the hall mark is, it's a crude representation of the London proof mark, a crown over the letter V. You sometimes see Khyber Pass guns with random western style letters stamped on them, the gun maker knew British guns had English words on them but not knowing how to read or write in English, they make no sense and are just random letters.
 

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Neat little piece . I know nothing about fake or real and stamp marks but if the price was right I would buy it even if it was a Khyber Pass knock off . Not sure I would shoot it if it is . Heard to many stories about soft steel .
 

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Neat little piece . I know nothing about fake or real and stamp marks but if the price was right I would buy it even if it was a Khyber Pass knock off . Not sure I would shoot it if it is . Heard to many stories about soft steel .
Sooner, any modern steel is stronger than the old wrought iron, My concern would be paying too high of a price for something that may or may not be genuine. If the bore is not rust pitted and the nipple and breech plug threads are in good condition and aren't going to go flying back at me, I'd shoot it.

Zabie is in Britain, loading or shooting it would be forbidden without the government's permission. And I suspect a trip to the London or Birmingham proof house before they grant it. @BlackEagle could probably tell us more about what hoops you'd have to go through over there before you could shoot it.
 

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I'll defer to Griz on it....go with what he says, not me.
 

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For the price you paid you did decent. On the pistol we are discussing I believe the peices or at least most of them are indeed old, but I have my doubts on if they all grew old together in it's current configuration. I could be wrong, and a hands on look would be something I'd need to do to make a better call on it. I suspect it's a Khyber Pass pistol made to look like a British made pistol, not to fool a modern collector, but to fool a colonial customer into thinking it's a higher quality British made piece. Thus the crude London 'proof mark" Here in America the Native peoples thought that the Barnett made Hudson Bay Company trade guns were big medicine. Other makers would put similar dragon shaped side plates and stamp a similar sitting fox logo on the locks to get a higher value in trade for them.
 

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Saw a video on Khyber Pass fakes and some of them were pretty sad !!! Some did look pretty good . I may be getting a little off topic but talking about faked markings I remember seeing a news report on people making nazi eagle stamps and stuff and marking guns that were not used in service by the nazis so they could get higher prices for them .
 

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Sooner some of the modern Khyber fakes are pretty good and some of them are obviously fakes. But they've been making guns there for a long time, so the gun could be from the 19th or early 20th century. Just as our forebears did in America, they didn't toss a functional lock or barrel off of an older gun in the trash, they recycled them into another gun. That's why I said I wasn't sure if those parts grew old together. The lock is a converted flintlock and the barrel is a percussion barrel, so they obviously aren't original one to the other. Now when they were made into a pistol is something I can't tell from a picture on the web. Whether the patina is old patina or a modern forced patina would take hands on to tell for sure but it looks to be a forced patina in the pictures. that doesn't mean it fake either it could just mean somebody overly agressively cleaned it and someone else wanted to make it look old again. or perhaps someone used some naval jelly on it to remove the old patina and wiped it off too soon leaving those dark stripes on the lock plate and bolster instead of a clean surface. Here in the States an aggressive cleaning damages the value, over there, not as much.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sooner some of the modern Khyber fakes are pretty good and some of them are obviously fakes. But they've been making guns there for a long time, so the gun could be from the 19th or early 20th century. Just as our forebears did in America, they didn't toss a functional lock or barrel off of an older gun in the trash, they recycled them into another gun. That's why I said I wasn't sure if those parts grew old together. The lock is a converted flintlock and the barrel is a percussion barrel, so they obviously aren't original one to the other. Now when they were made into a pistol is something I can't tell from a picture on the web. Whether the patina is old patina or a modern forced patina would take hands on to tell for sure but it looks to be a forced patina in the pictures. that doesn't mean it fake either it could just mean somebody overly agressively cleaned it and someone else wanted to make it look old again. or perhaps someone used some naval jelly on it to remove the old patina and wiped it off too soon leaving those dark stripes on the lock plate and bolster instead of a clean surface. Here in the States an aggressive cleaning damages the value, over there, not as much.
Thanks for your knowledge
 

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Such as it is, it may be worth what you paid for it and that was nothing. :) On the bright side you did get three pistols at a decent price. I build modern reproductions of antique guns or did before a stroke put a stop to it, and I couldn't have made a pistol like it for the price you paid for it and I make my own barrels so they cost me only my time. it would cost me more for the parts to make one like it than you paid for all three of them.
 

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Here is something to look at that just got posted a little while ago you might enjoy looking at. This persons mother has a fake antique pistol, at least yours is a real pistol of unknown age and origin.Antique Flintlock 1700’s maybe...
Hawg, it could be legit considering where the pistol is likely to be from, it could be that the pistol has been cut down from a full stock. That would explain the strange entry thimble and forward ram rod pipe without any under rib to hold it in place.
 
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For what you paid for the three. I'd have bought them as well, for display pieces. Good purchase. IMHO.
 
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Yes some of them gun makers are very talented considering how some them guns are made . Saw some couldn't paid me to of fired a firecracker in one when seeing how were made . If some of them had the machines and tools to use they would be making big $ over here . Zabie with a 3 for 1 deal you did do good on that for sure . Those other 2 you showed are very cool !!! The CCW of their time !!!!!
 
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