Taurus model 82 38sp?

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by TammyR, Apr 15, 2018.

  1. Kosh75287

    Kosh75287 Well-Known Member

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    A 4" barreled 6-shot .38 Special has kept a lot of people safe for a lot years. Nothing wrong with your choice.
    In deference to your recently broken wrist, let me suggest that you spend some extra money and get a box of 148gr. Hollow-base WadCutter (HBWC) ammunition to run through your revolver. It is by no means the least expensive ammunition available for .38 Special, but it IS the mildest, and will be kind to your wrist when first learning the weapon. Given its unusual (for most purposes) bullet shape, it is also not kind to bad guys who insist on being ventilated before seeing the error of their ways.
    If you find, later, that you can tolerate more powerful "standard" or +P rounds when practicing, so much the better, but you can still learn on the ammunition I suggested.
    If the revolver does not come with soft rubber grips, these can be replaced with Pachmayr ("PACK-my-ur") or other brand of grips, which will mitigate recoil a little. Shop around for a pair which fit your hand as well as the revolver. The most comfortable grips on the planet will do you no good, if they are too big for you to get a good grasp on the weapon.
    Lastly, practice regularly with the most powerful ammunition your orthopedic condition will tolerate. Consistently putting 6 rounds into a gallon-size milk jug is more than sufficient accuracy, though more is always desirable. Once the repeated ability to do this is obtained, concentrate on speed, always striving to stay on the milk jug, 6 out of 6 shots, at 10 yards.
    A little bit later, the goal will be to put 2 shots in the milk jug and one shot in an apple above it. This will happen slowly at first. When it becomes easier, concentrate on doing it more rapidly, always focusing on keeping the 1st 2 shots on the milk jug and the 3rd shot on the "apple".
    You may achieve this skill in one or two range sessions. Do not be discouraged if you do not. Practice and concentration are the keys.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
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  2. TammyR

    TammyR New Member

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    Thank you Kosh! That sounds like great advice! How do you feel about Taurus? Do you think it's reliable?
     
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  3. Gun Geezer

    Gun Geezer Well-Known Member

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    If there's one thing I've learned in my 60 some odd yrs. of gun ownership it's that there is no one size fits all gun. There are however a few absolutes: The heavier the gun, the less recoil & the larger the caliber the more recoil. The older I get, the harder it is for my arthritic hands to tolerate the sharp snap of small, light weight, large caliber revolver. Also, the smaller, larger caliber revolvers usually hold fewer rounds, a definite negative for these 75 yr. old eyes.

    Therefore, I respectfully recommend the following: Get two guns. Your house gun can be the heaviest, longest barrel, largest caliber, most rounds you can handle & shoot accurately at close range. If you decide on .38 cal., I would buy a .357 mag. & load it with whatever .38 cal. ammo you are comfortable with. The .357 will usually have a heavier frame & cylinder & you always have the option of the higher powered round.

    For a carry gun, you usually have to compromise more. IMHO it would be better to stick to the same caliber as your house gun. I have a Ruger LCR in .357 mag & keep it loaded with .38's. I used to pocket carry a S&W titanium, hammerless .38. It was so light I'd often forget it was in my pocket. Actually, the 5 rnds of +P ammo weighed more than the empty revolver. The problem was shooting it accurately. It was so snappy, getting it back on target was, at best, iffy. I gave it to my daughter-in-law & after she shot it once, she bought a Glock 42 for her EDC.

    I recently purchased a Ruger LCR in .327 Federal Mag. It's exactly the same size as all the other LCR's but lighter. A bonus is that it holds 6 rounds of .327 instead of the usual 5. It also has the flexibility of being able to shoot 3 different calibers of ammo. Truthfully, I haven't fired it yet, but it carries well. Ruger also makes it in its SP 100 series revolvers.

    All that being said, many times it's easier to simply grab my Kel-Tec P3AT in its DeSantes Nemesis holster with it's extra mag, the smallest, lightest, most concealable pistol made, knowing I have 15 rounds of .380 should I need them. The bad news is, should I need them, I can feel the bruises starting to form on my thumb & heel of my left hand already.
     
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  4. TammyR

    TammyR New Member

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    Gun Geezer, thanks for your feedback. Can you recommend a reliable 357 that's less than $450?
     
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  5. drymag

    drymag Well-Known Member

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    There are some nice used revolvers out there that will save some money.

    The 14lbs is similar to other 38's. The main difference is the width and shape of the sp101 makes the pull easier than a thinner trigger. Might be that whole psi thing in the mix.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 16, 2018
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  6. TammyR

    TammyR New Member

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    I'm sure there are, but I have no idea how to pick one out that is in good shape.
     
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  7. GrumpyOldGuy

    GrumpyOldGuy Member

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    I have one, a 2 inch model. More importantly my wife like to use it. The grip is very good which is really important if your hands are not strong, it weighs enough that recoil is controllable and the price is excellent. Ours is 100% reliable I would expect the same from any revolver.

    The downside is double action it is not machined as well as some of the more expensive revolvers. It require a fairly long, hard trigger pull which she hates. She ends up cocking it and firing single action only. This works for her, just real slow. I would dry fire in double action a few times before you buy. That may or may not drive you to look at the more expensive pistols.
     
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  8. TammyR

    TammyR New Member

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    Thanks Grumpy, but I prefer to have a 4 inch barrel. And that trigger sounds iffy, but I appreciate the offer.
     
  9. Firpo

    Firpo Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Here are some things to look for when buying a revolver.

     
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  10. TammyR

    TammyR New Member

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    Thanks Firpo!
     
  11. Rugermanws

    Rugermanws Active Member

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    If you're protecting the home I'd look for a 4 inch revolver. This would give you an extra round and more weight to help with recoil. I own a Taurus 85 5 shot but I carry it so it needs to be small but for the home I'd go a little bigger
     
  12. TammyR

    TammyR New Member

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    Thank you rugerman! I Just bought a 357 windicator with a 4" barrel and went with 38 ammo to lesson the recoil. I like the fit, feel, and weight of it. I'm looking forward to trying it out.
     
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  13. UncleFudd

    UncleFudd Well-Known Member

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    Tammy
    Very good advice from all and I also agree with the use of or purchase of the SP series of revolvers.
    Having said that and back to your original question the mod 82 specifically.
    They are excellent handguns period. In fact, since the demise of the pinned barreled S&W the Taurus revolvers are better than the Smiths.
    But as pointed out about the mod 82 in particular, (I have 2 of them 4") the triggers are VERY stiff out of the box. As you have described your situation with your wrist you should be absolutely certain that you will be able too use the trigger with more than just the original shot. Be sure your hand and wrist are strong enough to pull the trigger numerous times as rapidly as possible.
    If you know someone who has firearms experience you might ask them to accompany you to look at some or to shoot some if possible before you buy.
    I was in the shooting range business and retail firearms business for more than 35 yrs and I never took advantage of anyone nor did I sell firearms that were not in good solid condition in every respect. I suspect you will find that carries to almost all, quality gun shops in your area. Most owners will not take advantage of you so I wouldn't worry so much about trying or looking at used models.
    Get the questions you want asked and answered ready, Make list and then go out and have a look.

    Good luck.

    UF
     
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  14. TammyR

    TammyR New Member

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    I appreciate your advice Uncle Fudd. I ended up going with a 357 Windicator with a 4" barrel. I'm hoping it's a decent gun. I like the weight and feel of it and I have no problem pulling the trigger in double action mode. I'm using 38 ammo to hopefully lesson the recoil a bit. I haven't been out to shoot it yet, hoping to do that soon.