The Gun is in Battery

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by wingspar, Oct 25, 2009.

  1. wingspar

    wingspar Member

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    Kind of a newbie question here. On another forum, there was a discussion about recoil springs vs something or other, that went to hell in a basket. Guys arguing. The term “the gun is in battery” was used extensively. I asked what that term meant, as I’d never heard of it before. The thread went on with the same guys arguing for another page. I should have known better than to ask such a remedial question in the middle of an argument. So, I thought I might get an answer over here. What is meant when “the gun is in battery”. This was about a Glock, which will be my next hand gun.
     
  2. johnlives4christ

    johnlives4christ Former Guest

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    what it means is that the gun is closed and ready to fire. the bolt closed on a bolt action is in battery, the slide all the way foreward on a glock is in battery. you might hear about a gun firing out of battery, that is when the gun fires even though the slide/bolt isnt all the way closed.

    ~john
     

  3. wingspar

    wingspar Member

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    You know, I don’t think I’ve ever heard the term “in battery” till the thread I mentioned on another forum, and just now I was reading a thread here that used that term. I couldn’t come up with anything thru a Google search, which I tried before starting this thread.

    Yes, I also saw mention of a gun “firing out of battery” in that thread. How can a gun do that??
     
  4. Kieran McCaig

    Kieran McCaig New Member

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    If you shoot enuff sooner or later you will see some strange things.And yes they can.
     
  5. glocknut

    glocknut Active Member

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    Its on the charger... :D
     
  6. johnlives4christ

    johnlives4christ Former Guest

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    most any gun can fire slightly out of battery. on my glock, if i pull the slide back just a tad the gun will still fire, i normally check any of my guns to see how much out of battery they will fire, meaning i try to pull the trigger when im moving the bolt/slide to see exactly where it will and wont let the hammer/striker fall. it's not unheard of for a gun to have an out of battery firing due to bad ammunition, and sometimes you'll get it during rapid fire, especially if gun is of poor quality or worn badly
     
  7. wingspar

    wingspar Member

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    I’ve been away from shooting for 20+ years, and my only semi-auto hand gun experience is a Ruger Semi-auto pistol my father bought new in 1950. Shot it last month for the first time in 20 or more years, and I can still hit what I aim at. Great gun.

    A Glock 19 or 17 will be my next hand gun. My only experience with semi-auto hand guns has been the Ruger 22. I have a 357, which I shoot 38's in a lot, and expect the Glock to be similar in recoil. Most of what I know about semi-auto center fire handguns is what I’ve read in the forums over the last couple of months. Tons to learn. Expect a few newbie questions from me from time to time, but I’m having a hard time picturing a gun that can fire before a round is fully chambered and not go KB.
     
  8. wingspar

    wingspar Member

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    Yep. That’s what Google said too. :D
     
  9. Kieran McCaig

    Kieran McCaig New Member

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    We all have new stuff to learn from this place.
     
  10. wingspar

    wingspar Member

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    That sounds scary, but maybe it isn’t. I wonder if there are any videos of guns firing out of battery on YouTube?
     
  11. wingspar

    wingspar Member

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    True with most hobbies. I’ve been a photographer for most of my life, and I can still learn a thing or two when I put grumpy old fart know it all mind to it. There is a lot of knowledge on this forum, and so far, it has become my default gun forum.
     
  12. woolleyworm

    woolleyworm Well-Known Member

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    That is because in nearly 100% of the cases, a KB or very scary situation DOES occur. When John was talking about "testing" a gun to see if it would fire out of battery, he didn't state that it was with a live round, I'm pretty certain he does this with an empty chamber or at worst, with a snap cap. There is NO WAY you'd ever want to attempt to create an out of battery with a live round.
     
  13. wingspar

    wingspar Member

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    That makes sense. Maybe he will come back and clarify that.

    I tried searching for firing out of battery on youtube, but didn’t find anything.
     
  14. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    When a gun fires a cartridge the pressures go in all direction, not just out the barrel. The cartridge case, usually made of brass, is the gasket or seal that keeps the gases from rushing out of the joint between the barrel and the device that hold the rearward pressure, the bolt. Some guns use metal protrusion operating on the barrel itself to assure the bolt stays closed. Some use spring pressure and inertia, or mechanical advantage to hold the bolt closed for a delayed time until the pressure subside.

    If the bolt is not locked and or fully closed the cartridge case body becomes exposed and not backed up by the steel of the barrel or the bolt. Brass is not tough at all and easily blown through if not backed up sufficiently. The hot expanding gases that blow out the cartridge case, from out of battery cartridge ignition, blow back into the face of the shooter... NOT GOOD! Out of battery firing of any gun is dangerous because the cartridge case, the gasket for the chamber, may blow out and put hot high pressure gases on the shooter.

    Guns usually include a disconnector device of some kind that disconnect the trigger mechanism from the ability to fire the cartridge UNLESS the bolt is fully closed. But what is fully? Every mechanical system has to have tolerances and limits and this disconnector function has them. With the semi-auto gun unloaded, the bolt (the slide in a pistol) closed but the hammer or striker cocked there is a point when you move the bolt to the rear that the pull of the trigger will no longer allow the hammer/striker to fall. When the slide is in any position but full closed the bolt/slide is "out of battery". "In Battery" is achieved when the bolt is fully closed. Because the disconnector has tolerances it is not an absolute guard against out of battery firing of the gun.

    I think the term comes from artillery guns and is just carried over to handguns and rifles. The "battery" is a placement of one or several guns in the field. I think "in battery" means the battery is ready to fire a gun or guns (???).

    LDBennett
     
  15. scudrunner

    scudrunner New Member

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    FYI.......

    And to tell you the truth......

    I didn't know this until I looked........

    Marriam-Websters on line Dictionary defines "BATTERY", amoung other things as......

    The position of readiness of a gun for firing.

    Pretty cut and dried......;)

    I have used the term for years hearing it in the Army first and yes, I knew what it meant but that is it in a "nut shell".