This Just Blew Me Away

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Insulation Tim, Apr 27, 2009.

  1. Insulation Tim

    Insulation Tim Well-Known Member

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    You Would Never Have Guessed . Make sure that you read the whole thing.

    Captain Kangaroo passed away on January 23, 2004 at age 76 , which is odd, because he always looked to be 76. (DOB: 6/27/27 ) His death reminded me of the following story.

    Some people have been a bit offended that the actor, Lee Marvin, is buried in a grave alongside 3 and 4-star generals at Arlington National Cemetery His marker gives his name, rank (PVT) and service (USMC). Nothing else.. Here's a guy who was only a famous movie star who served his time, why the heck does he rate burial with these guys? Well, following is the amazing answer:

    I always liked Lee Marvin, but didn't know the extent of his Corps experiences.

    In a time when many Hollywood stars served their country in the armed forces often in rear echelon posts where they were carefully protected, only to be trotted out to perform for the cameras in war bond promotions, Lee Marvin was a genuine hero. He won the Navy Cross at Iwo Jima There is only one higher Naval award... the Medal Of Honor!

    If that is a surprising comment on the true character of the man, he credits his sergeant with an even greater show of bravery.

    Dialog from "The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson": His guest was Lee Marvin.. Johnny said, "Lee, I'll bet a lot of people are unaware that you were a Marine in the initial landing at Iwo Jima .and that during the course of that action you earned the Navy Cross and were severely wounded."

    "Yeah, yeah.... I got shot square in the bottom and they gave me the Cross for securing a hot spot about halfway up Suribachi. Bad thing about getting shot up on a mountain is guys getting' shot hauling you down. But, Johnny, at Iwo . I served under the bravest man I ever knew... We both got the Cross the same day, but what he did for his Cross made mine look cheap in comparison. That dumb guy actually stood up on Red beach and directed his troops to move forward and ge t the hell off the beach. Bullets flying by, with mortar rounds landing everywhere and he stood there as the main target of gunfire so that he could get his men to safety. He did this on more than one occasion because his men's safety was more important than his own life.

    That Sergeant and I have been lifelong friends. When they brought me off Suribachi we passed the Sergeant and he lit a smoke and passed it to me, lying on my belly on the litter and said, "Where'd they get you Lee?" "Well Bob... if you make it home before me, tell Mom to sell the outhouse!"

    Johnny, I'm not lying, Sergeant Keeshan was the bravest man I ever knew.
    The Sergeant's name is Bob Keeshan. You and the world know him as Captain Kangaroo."

    On another note, there was this wimpy little man (who passed away) on PBS, gentle and quiet. Mr. Rogers is another of those you would least suspect of being anything but what he now portrays to our youth. But Mr. Rogers was a U.S. Navy Seal, combat-proven in Vietnam with over twenty-five confirmed kills to his name. He wore a long-sleeved sweater on TV, to cover the many tattoos on his forearm and biceps. He was a master in small arms and hand-to-hand combat, able to disarm or kill in a heartbeat

    After the war Mr. Rogers became an ordained Presbyterian minister and therefore a pacifist. Vowing to never harm another human and also dedicating the rest of his life to trying to help lead children on the right path in life. He hid away the tattoos and his past life and won our hearts with his quiet wit and charm.



    America's real heroes don't flaunt what they did; they quietly go about their day-to-day lives, doing what they do best. They earned our respect and the freedoms that we all enjoy.
    Look around and see if you can find one of those heroes in your midst.
    Often, they are the ones you'd least suspect, but would most like to have on your side if anything ever happened.

    Take the time to thank anyone that has fought for our freedom. With encouragement they could be the next Captain Kangaroo or Mr. Rogers.
     
  2. USMCSpeedy

    USMCSpeedy Member

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    I've read this before and I've know others like them. The most common, down to earth, men and some women that did things in the service of this country that would suprise (at the least) and sometimes shock others. For them:

    HAND SALUTE......

    TWO.......
     

  3. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    I have read that before but had forgotten about it.

    I say that the true heros don't run around hollering "look at me, I am a hero". They are very quiet, common people.

    I would like to salute my Father who was on Guadacanal but never really talks about it. In all of my years of asking, he has only told one story about having to jump into a latrine once while the Japs were bombing the island. I SALUTE YOU DAD, YOU ARE A TRUE HERO TO ME!!
     
  4. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    Great story. Must of been a helluva Marine, too. When you consider that he was born in June of 1927, and at the ripe old age of 17 was a sergeant in the USMC at the Battle of Iwo Jima (February and March of 1945).

    I'm impressed. I knew the Corps needed men, during the war. I knew they were taking them young. But, wow. That's just - wow.

    Bogus.

    Also, the Mr. Rogers story is kahrk. He was never in the military. He was ordained in 1962. We weren't even in the war, then. He was born in 1929, which would make him around 35 when we got into the war. Little bit old to be going to war, especially as a sniper. That's a young man's game. Carlos Hathcock, for example, was born in '42.

    Mr. Rogers explained, on some TV interview, that he wore the sweaters ever since his first job in radio. They kept the studio cold so the machinery did not overheat. He also said that he played the piano on the first radio show, and the piano was on the other side of the studio from the actors' mikes. He started wearing sneakers so he could run from the mike to the piano and back without the listeners hearing his footsteps.
     
  5. 4EvrLearning

    4EvrLearning New Member

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    I have also seen this e-mail come through and also checked it out and learned it was full of urban legends. Sad that people have nothing better to do than fabricate stories around important events. Certainly there were enough true heroes that we don't need "fake" ones.

    To the true ones...you have my undying gratitude.
     
  6. USMCSpeedy

    USMCSpeedy Member

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    I found the following on Wikipedia from Lee Marvin's page and Bob Keeshan's page. Fred Rogers' page said nothingabout any form of military service.

    Marvin left school to join the US Marine Corps, serving as a sniper in the 4th Marine Division. He was wounded in action during the WWII Battle of Saipan. Most of his platoon were killed during the battle. Marvin's wound (in the buttocks) was from machine-gun fire which severed his sciatic nerve. [4] He was awarded the Purple Heart medal and was given a medical discharge with the rank of Private First Class.[5] Contrary to rumors, Marvin did not serve with Bob Keeshan during World War II.

    Keeshan himself never saw combat, having enlisted too late in the war to go overseas.

    I still salute Lee and Bob for serving our country no matter how the stories have been exagerated. I also have great respect for the late Fred Rogers for his work in influencing young children in a positive way (including me).
     
  7. muddober

    muddober Active Member

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    Insulation Tim: I know when you posted this story you thought it was true, which reminds me of something a math teacher of all things told me over 50 years ago, and that was "don't believe anything you hear and only about half of what you see" while maybe a bit cynical it isn't really very far off the mark.

    Ron
     
  8. kutaho

    kutaho New Member

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    Check out Audry Murphy.
     
  9. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    There are some surprises here:

    http://www.militaryhub.com/article/eddie-albert
    Pops
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 28, 2009
  10. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    This one also surprised me:

    Pops
     
  11. USMCSpeedy

    USMCSpeedy Member

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    Also James Garner

    Later, he joined the National Guard serving seven months stateside. He then went to Korea for 14 months in the United States Army, serving in the 24th Infantry Division in the Korean War. He was injured twice, first in the face and hand from shrapnel fire from a mortar round, and second in the buttocks from friendly fire from U.S. fighter jets as he dove headfirst into a foxhole in April 23, 1951. Garner was awarded the Purple Heart in Korea for the first injury. For the second wound, he received a second Purple Heart (eligibility requirement: "As the result of friendly fire while actively engaging the enemy"), although Garner received the medal in 1983, 32 years after his injury.
     
  12. artabr

    artabr New Member

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    Last edited: Apr 28, 2009
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