THIS MAY BE OUR FUTURE QUISINE !

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by rockntractor, Apr 2, 2009.

  1. rockntractor

    rockntractor Former Guest

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    http://www.detnews.com/article/2009...5/To+urban+hunter++next+meal+is+scampering+by
    Travels with Charlie
    To urban hunter, next meal is scampering by
    Detroit retiree, 69, supplements his income by living off the land

    Detroit - When selecting the best raccoon carcass for the special holiday roast, both the connoisseur and the curious should remember this simple guideline: Look for the paw.

    "The paw is old school," says Glemie Dean Beasley, a Detroit raccoon hunter and meat salesman. "It lets the customers know it's not a cat or dog."

    Beasley, a 69-year-old retired truck driver who modestly refers to himself as the Coon Man, supplements his Social Security check with the sale of raccoon carcasses that go for as much $12 and can serve up to four. The pelts, too, are good for coats and hats and fetch up to $10 a hide.







    While economic times are tough across Michigan as its people slog through a difficult and protracted deindustrialization, Beasley remains upbeat.

    Where one man sees a vacant lot, Beasley sees a buffet.

    "Starvation is cheap," he says as he prepares an afternoon lunch of barbecue coon and red pop at his west side home.

    His little Cape Cod is an urban Appalachia of coon dogs and funny smells. The interior paint has the faded sepia tones of an old man's teeth; the wallpaper is as flaky and dry as an old woman's hand.

    Beasley peers out his living room window. A sushi cooking show plays on the television. The neighborhood outside is a wreck of ruined houses and weedy lots.

    "Today people got no skill and things is getting worse," he laments. "What people gonna do? They gonna eat each other up is what they gonna do."

    A licensed hunter and furrier, Beasley says he hunts coons and rabbit and squirrel for a clientele who hail mainly from the South, where the wild critters are considered something of a delicacy.

    Though the flesh is not USDA inspected, if it is thoroughly cooked, there is small chance of contracting rabies from the meat, and distemper and Parvo cannot be passed onto humans, experts say.

    Doing for yourself, eating what's natural, that was Creation's intention, Beasley believes. He says he learned that growing up in Three Creeks, Ark.

    "Coon or rabbit. God put them there to eat. When men get hold of animals he blows them up and then he blows up. Fill 'em so full of chemicals and steroids it ruins the people. It makes them sick. Like the pigs on the farm. They's 3 months old and weighing 400 pounds. They's all blowed up. And the chil'ren who eat it, they's all blowed up. Don't make no sense."

    Hunting is prohibited within Detroit city limits and Beasley insists he does not do so. Still, he says that life in the city has gone so retrograde that he could easily feed himself with the wildlife in his backyard, which abuts an old cement factory.

    He procures the coons with the help of the hound dogs who chase the animal up a tree, where Beasley harvests them with a .22 caliber rifle. A true outdoorsman, Beasley refuses to disclose his hunting grounds.

    "This city is going back to the wild," he says. "That's bad for people but that's good for me. I can catch wild rabbit and pheasant and coon in my backyard."

    Detroit was once home to nearly 2 million people but has shrunk to a population of perhaps less than 900,000. It is estimated that a city the size of San Francisco could fit neatly within its empty lots. As nature abhors a vacuum, wildlife has moved in.

    A beaver was spotted recently in the Detroit River. Wild fox skulk the 15th hole at the Palmer Park golf course. There is bald eagle, hawk and falcon that roam the city skies. Wild Turkeys roam the grasses. A coyote was snared two years ago roaming the Federal Court House downtown. And Beasley keeps a gaze of skinned coon in the freezer.

    With the beast fresh from the oven, Beasley invites a guest to lunch.

    He believes coon meat tastes something like mutton or pork, but to the uneducated pallet, it has the aroma and texture of opossum.

    While Beasley preps his coon with simple vinegar brine and spices, there are 100 ways to cook a coon.

    There is roast coon with sweet potato, sausage and corn bread stuffing; raccoon cobbler and roast marinated raccoon with liver and onion. It is this reporter's opinion that the best sauce for coon may very well be hunger.

    The story of Glemie Dean Beasley plays like a country song. The son of a sharecropper, Beasley left school at 13 to pick cotton. He came to Detroit in 1958. His woman left him in 1970 for a man he calls Slick Willy.

    Someone stole his pickup truck and then someone killed his best dog.

    "I knowed some hard times," Beasley says. "But a man's got to know how to get hisself through them hard times. Part of that is eating right."

    Travels with Charlie charlie@detnews.com Travels With Charlie will appear each Thursday in The Detroit News.
     
  2. 1shot1k

    1shot1k Former Guest

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    Intersesting story and link. Heard on radio today that Michigan havin it pretty bad for some time now. I knew they were. Report says " 1 family" evry 12 minutes..pullin out and movin. And not gettin replaced by newcomers equally either. And says best folks leavin...young, educated, etc......not good. *


    *Will check back later to see if censored or how much.
     

  3. wookie810

    wookie810 New Member

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    I don't know them raccoons are looking pretty tasty these days JK. I suspect that a lot more people in my area will start hunting to supplement their food stamps though.
     
  4. jim summers

    jim summers Well-Known Member

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    I reside in southern Indiana, you can almost step
    Never cared for coon as table fare, it was a little to greasy for my taste.
     
  5. artabr

    artabr New Member

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    What, y'all don't eat coon? :confused: :p :D


    Art

    Photo taken from bayoushooter.com
     

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    Last edited: Apr 3, 2009
  6. Dakota Red 1

    Dakota Red 1 New Member

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    There is vid with this. At the end, Mr. Beasley gives a good rendition of "The Thrill is Gone".

    We would BBQ the darned things after getting the fat off and cooking out some of the grease. Just use the young ones.
     
  7. glocknut

    glocknut Active Member

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    THE FORUM MASCOTT...
    I WILL PASS....

    mike
    gn
     
  8. Dakota Red 1

    Dakota Red 1 New Member

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    Well, looking at Art's picture, it would be just a few more steps to get some shrimp and softshell crab from Leon.
     
  9. 1shot1k

    1shot1k Former Guest

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    Hey art...while on cuisine subject..thought of you other day while sittin at hospital with wife...readin a sports hunt book...guy was goin down to LA on mission to do report on a favorite local food..cant remember name...but you could buy it at local gas stations, roadside cafe's etc...is famous "sausage like" deal...exclusive pork I think it was....hand held and ate like a sausage or burrito..but people woul ddrive long way for it...will try to look it up...?:D
     
  10. rockntractor

    rockntractor Former Guest

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    thats boudin, i made 10 pounds last week.made from rice, pork,pork liver. also seafood boudin with shrimp and crawdads.
     
  11. oldogy

    oldogy New Member

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    I've eaten coon in my much younger days. Not bad if prepared right. If I remember right the meat was dark and stringy.
    oldogy
     
  12. oscarmayer

    oscarmayer New Member

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    was tricked into eating coon once. a friend of mine was cooking in his one room apartmant attached to the gas station he managed and no his name wasn't gomer or goober. he was stewing something that smelled great. i asked him what was cookin up he replied try it first . i did and it was great. after a plate full he told me it was racoon. normally that wouldn't of bothered me but at the time i owned a pet racoon that i raised from the day it was born. i felt like a jerk for eating a possible relation of my pet. never had it since
     
  13. rockntractor

    rockntractor Former Guest

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    it was probably a cousin niece or nephiew many times removed i would'nt feel to bad. by the way oscermayer is so appropriate for this thread.
     
  14. pinecone70

    pinecone70 Active Member

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    Oh eeew. I think once my freezer is empty, I may have to learn to appreciate plants...
     
  15. artabr

    artabr New Member

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    Yeah, 1 Shot, Rockntractor is correct. Boudin is what you are looking for.
    Good stuff. I'm not a big fan of seafood boudin but I'll tear up a plate of regular boudin. Hell, I'll eat a link for breakfast. A lot of workers around these parts will eat a link or two at the 9 o'clock break.
    Ya gotta be carefull tho. Not all boudin is created equal. See link (pun intended) below. ;) :p :D

    http://www.boudinlink.com/


    My favorite is from Legnon's Boucherie in New Iberia. ;)


    Art
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2009
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