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Don, I have a feeling that new to you .45-70 is going to thump pretty good, those things don't weigh a whole heck of a lot. I figured my Sharps would put a thump on me the first time I shot it but at a touch over 10 pounds it wasn't bad with black powder loads. Far more pleasant than my friends Marlin in .45-70, those things thump pretty good :)
 

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With black powder they might not be too bad, the one that put a hurt on my shoulder was a Marlin guide gun and factory ammo and it wasn't the trapdoor safe ammo, lol.
 

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On those crescent butt plates you don't hold them on your shoulder like a shotgun butt. You hold them out on the ball of you shoulder with the top of the crescent over you shoulder and the bottom under you arm pit. Elbow up and upper arm at 90°to your body. Raising or lowering your elbow adjusts the tilt of the rifle.
 

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Perzackly!!!
I'm stealin' that word Vic. Back in the old days as rifles were transitioning from front stuffer to cartridge you could get a rifle with a rifle (crescent) butt plate or a shotgun (flat) butt plate. The 1877 Sharps could be had with both styles, I think Sharps,( the company, not our Vic) referred to them as English or American styles. Those late Vincent Ohio style rifles will teach you how to hold a front stuffer correctly in short order. Good thing they were small caliber rifles or their exaggerated crescent butt plates would puncture you in two places if you held them like a shotgun stocked rifle.
 
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For your viewing pleasure, an original John Vincent full stocked percussion Ohio rifle. Caleb Vincent's half stocked rifles had an even worse "evil" pitchforked crescent butt plate. :)
Rectangle Wood Slope Parallel Font

Caleb's butt plates were about an inch longer on the top of the crescent.
 

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Me and my .45-70 "thumper" after it's first round downrange, it's still in the white at this point of the build and you can tell by the grin on my face that the "thump" or the evil crescent butt plate didn't bother me too badly.
Plant Plant community Ecoregion Hat Sky
 

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Gemmer anything's are just COOL!!!!

I haven't G-2 but, I've just about always had something dangerous game suitable. I never harbored any serious dreams of Africa, I did that vicariously through several friends. I just like the rifles...uhhh...the OLD rifles, doubles, old Mausers, Mannlichers and the like. None of the newer stuff, say post 1950, hold any appeal for me at all EXCEPT for the Ruger #1 and I'd rather it was an Alex Henry but, they're cost prohibitive for me.

Alexander Henry, Edinburgh --- Hammer Underlever Falling Block Single Shot Stalking Rifle --- .450 3 1/4" BPE for sale (gunsinternational.com)

That's the only single Henry I could find quickly...they're sumthin'
Before I built that Gemmer styled Sharps I was tempted to buy a modern made copy of the Frank Wesson number one long range action and build on one of them. Alexander Henry sued Wesson for patent infringement on the lever release on that action and won even though Wesson built them before Henry filed for the patent on it's release mechanism. It's still up in the air who came up with it first or if they both came up with it independently, Henry filed for the patent first and Wesson had to stop making them.
 

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i liked it so much i cast a small pile of more 350gr 45-70 bullets and prepared a bunch of cases. tomorrow, tomorrow, more fun tomorrow.
what did you'all do?
You'll have to try 405 grain bullets in it, you might get the group to close up a bit. what did we all do, why, I read about you thumping some bp rounds and wish I could still get up in the hills and thump my shoulder with one of them.
 
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Thanks, did not know this. I'm gonna try this now, luckily I am a lefty and would have been hesitant to shoot it that way if I were right handed since I dislocated and broke my right shoulder.
You ever wonder why you see pictures of recoats or continental soldiers in battle line formation firing their muskets and they have their elbow up and their arm out like that? It looks funny to us moderns, kind of like a chicken flapping a wing, but that's why they held their rifles and muskets that way.
 

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There are a lot of things we see in old movies or even cartoons that many of us think as clichés like blowing the smoke from a barrel or pointing a revolver at the sky and cocking it as it comes down to point and fire. Blowing on the barrel kept the fouling soft because of the moisture in their breath and pointing a revolver up to cock it prevented the spent cap from falling into the action and jamming it. Smokeless powder and cartridge ammo did away with the need to do those things.
 

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Ouch is right - what rifle did he hold on his arm like that?
The real question is why did he hold it to his upper arm like that? Did you double dog dare him?
 

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Welcome to the addiction! Next thing you know you'll be looking at front stuffing Pennsyltucky long rifles and and half stocked Hawken rifles.... :eek:
 
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