The Firearms Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,585 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been working on a 77MkII the last few weeks rebedding the stock and installing a Timney trigger to replace the factory two-tonner.

Got the new Timney installed and I'm noticing that the top surface of the sear presses against the bolt body pretty hard when cycling the action. It's a bit taller than the factory sear and it sticks up into the bolt channel a bit.
I don't recall this being a problem when I installed a Timney in my other 77MkII a few years ago.

I'm thinking I need to shorten up the sear so it's flush with the bolt channel or slightly below...which is how the factory sear fits. Yes? No? Maybe?

Anyone else come across this before?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,725 Posts
Never seen that issue but consider this. If you do shorten it, then engagement surface is less. Not always a huge problem but in a slam shut condition it may fail to catch. Im assuming you tightened the allen screw on the trigger housing to lock it in position (if it has one, I know the bold triggers do) It will pull everything downwards when you do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,379 Posts
If the sear is so tall that it hits the bolt body, trimming some off shouldn't reduce the engagement enough to be a problem. But I don't know how hard those sears are and I wonder if cutting it could cut through case hardening and cause trouble later on.

My thinking is that you have the wrong trigger or have it set up wrong some way, as it just shouldn't act like that. I suggest double check with both Timney and/or Ruger as to why the trigger doesn't seem to fit.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,585 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Helix,
This is on a MkII action. The sear and trigger are two separate pieces that pin to the reciever, it's not a one-piece unit like most others.

Next time I get back to the farm, I'll grab my other MkII and compare it's Timney pieces to this new set.
Timney must've changed something in the past 7-8 years or so, as this new set was pretty rough looking compared to the older sets and will need quite a bit of polish work to clean the tool marks off the sear engagement surface on the trigger. Plus there's a lot more meat on the overtravel screw boss and safety engagement surface than on the earlier ones.

Comparing to the factory pieces, the top surface of the sear to cocking piece is about 0.007" higher than the factory one. Not much but the sear is nickel coated so I'd be breaking through that if I reduced the top. I could silver-solder some shim stock to the underside but then I'd have to completely re-cut the sear engagement. Not the path I'm looking for.

Need to get my macro lens for my Pentax back from the folks so I can snap some pictures to send to Timney (I'll post them up here too).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,379 Posts
I'll tell this on myself. I was installing an after market trigger (I don't recall the brand) in a rifle I'll call a Remchester Model 123B. I was having trouble; nothing seemed to go right. My frustration and muttered cusses finally attracted the attention of my boss. He wandered over to the bench, looked at the rifle, looked at the trigger, and picked up the box the trigger came in. He shook out an envelope holding a small washer. Then he picked up the instructions (which I hadn't bothered to read, having installed lots of triggers) and pointed out one little note: "This trigger is for the Model 123; if installing on a Model 123B place the enclosed washer under Screw A." :banghead:

Jim
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top