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Winning the Battle of the Mariana's put us in the position to easily fly bombing missions directly over Japan's mainland. While many other battles were yet to come (Okinawa, etc), Saipan allowed us to bomb the hell out of the enemy homeland at will. For those interested, check out the history, as this event also spurred the famous 'Mariana's Turkey Shoot', where we were able to destroy a majority of enemy pilots when we found out that the Japanese fleet was spotted heading toward Saipan to help defend it. Our navy and pilots kicked their butts, devastating the enemy's ability to fight us effectively in future. Amazing stories.
One thing that makes me chuckle sometimes....although not really funny. Imagine all the Marines and Army who landed on Saipan, with an armada of Navy ships offshore. After Navy commanders learned that the enemy fleet was spotted coming north towards us, our Navy picked up anchors and sped south to meet the enemy, where we kicked their butts in the air. But, the GI's on Saipan went to sleep the night before with our Navy taskforce covering them offshore. When they woke up the next morning, our guys looked out to the ocean and saw nothing, no ships. Imagine that feeling. Talk about feeling alone during a vicious battle. Anyway, we won bigtime. My father was on that island, and came out alive. Semper Fi.
 

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Thanks to your father, as well as mine, for a truly "Job-Well Done".
 

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Thanks to all who served and those who didn't make it.

I remember the battles of WWII big and small. I used to study them when I was young which is why I joined up.

Saipan was one of the nastier ones for the Marines and also for the 27th Division of the US Army. At the time it was the most costly battle that had been fought in the Pacific. 2,949 Americans were killed and 10,464 wounded, out of 71,000 who landed on the island. For the Japanese, they died almost to the last man - at least 30,000 Japanese died. Saipan was also the very beginnings of the Kamikaze attacks - though few in number at Saipan they were very prevalent during the battle of Leyte Gulf just 5 months later. The idea of using Kamikaze attacks against US ships had only been proposed in Japan one month before the invasion of Saipan.
 
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