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Discussion Starter #1
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Looking to find out the year and more details about this gun. Value (if any)?

Top break, 5 round cylinder, wood grips, .32

Serial A33xxx on grip.
Matching number without the “A” on trigger guard and barrel section above cylinder.

Thank you in advance.
 

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It looks like an Iver Johnson 2nd Model Safety Hammer Automatic Revolver, but the hammer is from a US Revolver. US Revolvers were made by Iver Johnson using surplus 2nd Model Safety Automatic frames once they switched to smokeless frames in 1909. Either way, it is a black powder frame and not safe for modern smokeless ammunition.

The grips are homemade.

What is stamped on the top of the barre? Both Iver Johnson and US used the A prefix, so we need to know which one it is to give you a date of manufacture.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
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Thank you very much guys.

There are no other markings that I can find anywhere. Here is a picture of the top of the barrel. Also a picture some of the internals. The flap on the what I think it the trigger return spring is gone. Also the other v shaped spring is in bad shape. Are parts to rebuild this available?
 

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I am going to say based upon the hammer, it is a US Revolver made between 1920-1921. I can get the exact year with the full serial number.

You can still find parts for this revolver online. Numrich Gun Parts sells them and they are also sold on eBay. This model is essentially a small frame old model. The only parts that will differ are the hammer and lifter.

Iver Johnson Safety Hammer revolvers used a transfer bar which doesn't let the hammer rest on the firing pin. They called the action "hammer the hammer" because you could strike the hammer while it was resting and it would not fire. A US Revolver dies not have this feature and the hammer will rest on the firing pin. If you hit the hammer of a US Revolver while it is resting, it is possible to discharge it. This was common on many older firearms and Iver Johnson used it as a safety feature to promote on their firearms.
 

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Not sure how familiar you are with firearms, so here is a schematic of the internals of an Iver Johnson 1st Model. The top latch is different, but the parts in the frame will be the same, with the exception of hammer (11) and lifter (23).

ipb-iverjohnson-topbreaka.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
A33979 is the full number.

This is great information. I appreciate it very much.

I am guessing it is not worth much based on its condition and being common.

Also perhaps not the best candidate to repair to make functional given the safety issue if dropped or struck.

In any event it is interesting to learn about!

I have an old shotgun that I may have to post about as well.

Thank you again for the help!
 

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It was made in 1922. You are correct there in not much value in US Revolvers in this condition.

That being said, they make wonderful projects for novice gunsmith. They are simple in design and the parts are readily available. I have fixed my share of Iver Johnson's and even started reloading black powder .32 S&W and .38 S&W to fire thru them. I wouldn't worry about the hammer resting on the firing pin unless you intend to carry it. The .32 SW is an anemic round, but a blast to shoot with black powder at the range. They always draw a crowd.
 
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