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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The powder looks good.
The powder works well from what I can tell but the inside of the cans of this 30 year old powder have a very fine cinnamon coating of what I suspect is rust.
I can transfer the powder to a mason jar clean out that can or just transfer the powder to a mason jar and label it.
 

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Simple glass is a no no. Find a plastic container w he right rating. Or another tin can. But never glass.
I see that modern powders are in plastic. Why no glass? I was also thinking to just pour out the powder with a fan on very low very far away to remove the dust, clean out the can and return the powder. The right rating?
 

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I see that modern powders are in plastic. Why no glass? I was also thinking to just pour out the powder with a fan on very low very far away to remove the dust, clean out the can and return the powder. The right rating?
No, leave it be! When you pull it out to use give it a gentile tumble to mix, three turns this way, then three turns on the other axis! There was a thread where lady Rae suggested filtering spilt powder through a flour colander, and my spirit was screaming "don't do it". As powder is munched, broken down into smaller particles, it becomes easier to ignite, which changes stuff, ignition, data, pressures. Something to be aware of as we go through our beautiful life He's given us! This is especially important to know concerning black powder and it's substitutes! Not that I have any idea of what I'm talking about.......

A plastic container is going to split, a glass container is going to burst into a thousand shards.
 

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I see that modern powders are in plastic. Why no glass? I was also thinking to just pour out the powder with a fan on very low very far away to remove the dust, clean out the can and return the powder. The right rating?
There is a triangle w a number in it on the bottom of every plastic container. That is a rating and use label and for recycling . Powder bottles are HDPE (High Density Polyethylene). Black keeps the sun/light off the powder. Glass breaks when you drop it. Do you really want your powder all over the place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There is a triangle w a number in it on the bottom of every plastic container. That is a rating and use label and for recycling . Powder bottles are HDPE (High Density Polyethylene). Black keeps the sun/light off the powder. Glass breaks when you drop it. Do you really want your powder all over the place.
Oh Ok…butterfingers. High density polyethylene..’that’s a filament i use in 3D printing.
I am going to search and order some BLACK HDPE pound containers to salvage these powders that otherwise appear viable. I am about to shoot 3k fps loads made with these…..
thanks to everyone for the help!
 

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On a related note, never store powder in a safe or other rigid, non-vented enclosure. In the event of a fire, this will convert simple propellant into a dangerous bomb.
 

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No ... Not Glass . Transfer the powder to a different container ... preferably one that is plastic and rated for the chemicals in gunpowder . Look at the bottom of a plastc powder container ... the containers of Bullseye and one of Titegroup are marked HDPE under a triangle with #2 inside the triangle ... #2 is recycling but the HDPE is the type of plastic ... the chemicals in gunpowder will Melt some plastics , the powder actually melts/eats a hole in the side of the container .
Another option is a metal can that Acetone comes in ... the acetone evaporates and leaves no residue that harms/contaminates gunpowder . A new metal can would be better if you can by one .
If you see red rust or dust in the powder ... it is beginning to break down .
The smell test is best ... if the powder smell acidic and hurts your nose ...it's going bad ...if the smell is not unpleasant , and doesn't hurt your nose ...it's OK .
Smell some known fresh powder so you get to know the bad from the good ... a good nose sniff can really tell you the condition of a powder.
Gary
 

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I saw article one time. Guy was out of powder and barrows some off neighbor. They ended up putting it in ketchup bottle for powder horn. Guy had tied binder twine for shoulder strap. Turns out he never made it home. He was wearing a wool jacket and glass rubbing back and forth built a static charge that ignited powder. Blame! end of story, he never did that again. Realize it was Black powder but could set of smokeless, especially in scenario sifting it around with fine oxidized iron mixed with it.
I had can of IMR-3031 have rust in it. I S- canned it. Wasn’t afraid of it but didn’t know if it would put out uniform results.
 

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I saw article one time. Guy was out of powder and barrows some off neighbor. They ended up putting it in ketchup bottle for powder horn. Guy had tied binder twine for shoulder strap. Turns out he never made it home. He was wearing a wool jacket and glass rubbing back and forth built a static charge that ignited powder. Blame! end of story, he never did that again. Realize it was Black powder but could set of smokeless, especially in scenario sifting it around with fine oxidized iron mixed with it.
I had can of IMR-3031 have rust in it. I S- canned it. Wasn’t afraid of it but didn’t know if it would put out uniform results.
I have my doubts about the validity of that story. I don't doubt you read it but static electricity won't set off black powder. It's been proved over and over again. It takes heat and static electricity doesn't produce enough heat.
 

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I might add:

As metal rusts it absorbs moisture, the metal and the moisture weight something. Therefore, this will effect the weight of your charge. While the amount of powder will be less, it could lead to other problems.

JAT
 

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The weight percentage of rust to powder wouldn’t be enough to cause anything more that accuracy problems. However that would be increased by the random amounts in given weight of powder. Also at what point does actual chemical break down of powder occur? Does the oxides have any effect on bore erosion? I don’t know and would rather S-can the powder than obsess over it.
 

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HDPE plastic has relatively low static charge. I’ve never had smokeless gunpowder cling too inside of a Hodgdon, IMR, Vihitavouri, or Accurate plastic canisters. HDPE is also chemical resistant.

The upside, well sorta, of a steel smokeless gunpowder canisters is any rust inside the canister, the steel as it oxidizes will absorb the oxygen in it. Cargo ships cargo holds made of uncoated steel with ongoing oxidation will absorb so much oxygen that people have died in the past from oxygen starvation.

Still if there is rust in the steel gunpowder canister, the rust particles can act as an micro abrasive when the cartridge is shot scoring the barrel bore.

What is more of a concern is if the gunpowder has degraded. If the flake, spherical, or kernel are puffed with ragged edges, and and gunpowder dust is present, the gunpowder is degraded. Use it as fertilizer for rose bushes. There’s a fair amount of nitrogen in smokeless gunpowders.
 

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Look up "static electricity and black powder." That should provide enough reading for a week or so. You can't generate a spark hot enough or of long enough duration to ignite black powder, especially not rubbing back in forth in a coat of any kind.

That and, BP granules don't offer enough resistance for the heat to build up to the ignition point of 400+ degrees as the static charge travels around the granules on the graphite coating. If static discharges were that hot, most of us would be walking around in the winter with little burn marks on our fingers....and maybe even ignite pets.....:whistle:

It's an urban myth that continues to be propagated.
 

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I use my questionable powder for the wife's house plants. She's very proud of her "green thumb"

😁

And if you are not worried about sketchy powders, I have 6 pounds of Winchester 452AA I would trade for primers.😎
 
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