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I would like to do a trigger job on my handgun and wondered what tools I need. Also, where to get the sharpening stones and other items that would be required.
I’m new to this site so I’m not sure if anyone has posted about this before.
Thanks for the help.
 

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If you’re talking about stoning surfaces and altering angles my suggestion is to have the work performed by a competent gunsmith. I was two benches over from a guy that did his own “trigger job” and managed to turn his 1911 into a machine gun. Just be careful.
 

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If you’re talking about stoning surfaces and altering angles my suggestion is to have the work performed by a competent gunsmith. I was two benches over from a guy that did his own “trigger job” and managed to turn his 1911 into a machine gun. Just be careful.
I had a 1911 sear wear out. When it did, the pistol went full auto until it emptied the mag. SURPRISE!
 

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The first time I did a 1911 trigger job was when I was in school.
I took it to the range and it went full auto. The range officer came up to me and said " next time give that bird more leed. " I felt like crawling under a rock. That was the first and last time I ever did a sloppy trigger job.
 

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I would like to do a trigger job on my handgun and wondered what tools I need. Also, where to get the sharpening stones and other items that would be required.
I’m new to this site so I’m not sure if anyone has posted about this before.
Thanks for the help.
I'm guessing you've never done that before, so my advice is to not do it. Gunsmiths attend school to learn that procedure, and when they buy tools and materials, they are used for a professional business, so the expense is spread over many such jobs.

To try this yourself without training is inviting trouble. It is very easy to mess it up to the point that not only will you endanger your life and the lives of anyone nearby, but you will end up taking the gun to a professional gunsmith who will charge you for not just the trigger job, but for the new replacement parts as well.

I've seen mistakes like that myself, done by a friend who thought he could do it.
 

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Brownells and Midway will have what you need. When stoning, stay away from sear angles, I don't care what type gun it is. The slightest reduction or change of angel on a sear can lead to very unwanted troubles.
 

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You can do a poor mans trigger job on a gun with a hammer without any tools. Cock the hammer and hold forward pressure on it and pull the trigger(make sure it's empty first). Do it a few times and it will smooth things out and remove any grittiness. Keep in mind what you're doing is accelerating wear so don't overdo it.
 

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Done a few simple trigger jobs myself. Like was said, NEVER change contact angles. Don't grind, just polish and burnish. A slightly lighter spring can make a big difference. I've done the old "Pentel Spring Trick" on a few Marlin .22LR rifles and my Ruger 10-22. Helped a whole lot. Make sure you have a source for new parts before any alteration. And do the bounce test on the action, making sure a shock won't trip the trigger, BEFORE ever loading the gun. Above all, BE SAFE!!
 

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The trigger "job" I did on the RIA build was to polish any contact surface I could find on the trigger stirrup with Flitz and to stone off any burrs I found on the disconnect and take off "color" not metal. I did bend back the center leaf on the Wilson Combat sear spring to match the one that came with the kit. I had the gun safety checked by a trusted gunsmith and when I took it to the range I only loaded 2 rounds in several magazines for the initial test. No "doubles".
 

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My 1911's have very good triggers right out of the box. My Ruger Blackhawk 44 mag has too light a trigger. It must be in the 2 to 3 lbs range. My S&W Jframe and my Ruger AR could use some help in the trigger area.

I think I will get a drop in trigger for my AR as I hate the trigger that is on it. I know I am not qualified to do any trigger modifications so if it wasn't a drop in I would send it to Goofy.
 

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Not knowing what gun the proposed trigger job is for makes advise difficult.
But the first thing I would suggest is a good "gunsmith" screwdriver set. Wheeler makes a pretty nice one at an affordable price. Then you are only looking to smooth out rough edges. Stones can be used, but jeweler's files, and fine sandpaper work too. Careful attention to function is very important. Some sharp edges are intended to be sharp. This is true with revolvers, autos, and rifles.
What to polish and where varies from one gun to another.
Work slowly and carefully. You can always remove more material, but putting it back might be beyond your ability.
 

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You can do a poor mans trigger job on a gun with a hammer without any tools. Cock the hammer and hold forward pressure on it and pull the trigger(make sure it's empty first). Do it a few times and it will smooth things out and remove any grittiness. Keep in mind what you're doing is accelerating wear so don't overdo it.
Do Not Do This and think you have a trigger job. Hopefully Hawg is joking.
Next someone will tell you to get a Dremel.

The only ay is to buy stones from Brownells for Midway. Watch a few videos and then copy what you have seen by professionals.
 

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An amateur can do a fine job IF they have a strong mechanical aptitude, and an understanding of exactly how the trigger is supposed to function. It's not rocket science.

If you are the kind of guy that burns the house down while changing a light fixture, then it's best to pay someone else to do it.
 

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What videos are on the internet done by Pros?.
Most are made by wanna bee Gunsmiths and I see them doing things wrong ALL THE TIME.
Mike
if you look online you can buy videos from the good gunsmiths the Master Class gunsmith you just did have to do your research for the ones you want
 
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