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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited by Moderator)
What is your definition of residue. Are you asking about powder residue or bullet lube residue?
Are you talking about what is left in the barrel or what is left in the action?
Sorry, just a bit confused about the question.
grcsat Sorry for the confusion. Powder residue in the chamber and in the barrel.

I think hes talking about leading the barrel maybe?
In the chamber and in the barrel.
 

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You will get more powder residue in the barrel of the rifle. With the pistol any powder that doesn't burn will be headed out the end of the barrel, into the air.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You will get more powder residue in the barrel of the rifle. With the pistol any powder that doesn't burn will be headed out the end of the barrel, into the air.
carver, thank you. How about powder residue in the chamber as well as in the barrel? What I am trying to determine is whether I should lean in favor of 22 caliber cartridges that have a 'gold' coating on the thinking that those cartridges create less of a mess and therefore easier to clean.
 

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carver, thank you. How about powder residue in the chamber as well as in the barrel? What I am trying to determine is whether I should lean in favor of 22 caliber cartridges that have a 'gold' coating on the thinking that those cartridges create less of a mess and therefore easier to clean.
The color of the bullet won't make any difference. The lead bullets do have a lube on them, and will get your hands dirtier, quicker. The chamber on a semi-auto pistol, or rifle, will see about the same amount of residue do to the fact that both are blow back designs.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The color of the bullet won't make any difference. The lead bullets do have a lube on them, and will get your hands dirtier, quicker. The chamber on a semi-auto pistol, or rifle, will see about the same amount of residue do to the fact that both are blow back designs.
carver, thank you for your clarification. i just thought, incorrectly, that the 'gold' covered cartridges would leave less residue behind due to the coating even though I knew that the lead-headed cartridges have a coating as well. Doesn't hurt to ask and doesn't hurt to learn. Again, thank you.
 

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Depends. Depends on the maker.

I see no difference in fouling between Federal Hi-Velocity (copper washed bullet) and Federal Lightning (lubed plain lead bullet).

Winchester, however, is a massive difference between their Super-X copper washed and their Wildcat plain lead (the Wildcat, while quite accurate, is the filtihest ammo I've ever fired).

Remington Golden Bullets aren't bad, but their Thunderbolts are not only dirty, but often don't fire.

Never tried the CCI lead bullets, so don't know, but their Mini Mags are extremely clean.

Never tried any Aguila copperwashed (do they even make any?) but their lead is very clean.

Bottom line - try and find out.

Buy a box of all the different ones you can find. With fifty rounds you'll know whether your gun likes it, and whether or not it's too dirty for you.
 

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carver, thank you for your clarification. i just thought, incorrectly, that the 'gold' covered cartridges would leave less residue behind due to the coating even though I knew that the lead-headed cartridges have a coating as well. Doesn't hurt to ask and doesn't hurt to learn. Again, thank you.
That Golden, or Copper color is there as a metallic coating to prevent lead fouling in the barrel. The lube on the plain lead bullets serve the same purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Depends. Depends on the maker.

I see no difference in fouling between Federal Hi-Velocity (copper washed bullet) and Federal Lightning (lubed plain lead bullet).

Winchester, however, is a massive difference between their Super-X copper washed and their Wildcat plain lead (the Wildcat, while quite accurate, is the filtihest ammo I've ever fired).

Remington Golden Bullets aren't bad, but their Thunderbolts are not only dirty, but often don't fire.

Never tried the CCI lead bullets, so don't know, but their Mini Mags are extremely clean.

Never tried any Aguila copperwashed (do they even make any?) but their lead is very clean.

Bottom line - try and find out.

Buy a box of all the different ones you can find. With fifty rounds you'll know whether your gun likes it, and whether or not it's too dirty for you.
Alpo, thank you for your response. It is just what I would expect from a TFF member. I was just thinking that because some cartridges have a "gold" coating that MAYBE it would lead to less fowling but apparently there is no difference other than the fact that lead-headed bullets make the hands quite dirty. Again, thank you.
 

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Oh, well, now the BRAND!!!!

There is a HE!! of a lot of difference in propellant residue between brands, and even between grades within the same brand.
 

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Alpo mentioned Aguila. I think all of it is made in Mexico, and from my experience, the odor of the propellant gasses makes me think they use donkey crap in their propellant formula. Plus, I've had so many failure-to-fire cartridges that I tried to give a box to my shooting partner. He did not accept it, and we just left it on the range bench as we left. Don't know who picked it up! LOL!
 

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Oh, well, now the BRAND!!!!

There is a HE!! of a lot of difference in propellant residue between brands, and even between grades within the same brand.
You got that right!:D
 

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I really don't want to say this, but residue is mostly decided by manufactor , chamber cut , bore diameter ,
Since about 1960 or so the 22Cal makers have tried to use componants to burn as clean as possible and designed to be self cleaning. The idea which still holds true today is that the bullet cleans the barrel after every shot. So in theory your barrel is just as dirty from the first shot as it is on you last shot.
Now this is were the theory goes wrong. There are over a dozen different types of 22 chambers.
Not to mention badly cut cambers and out of speck chambers. The tighter the chamber, the less fouling you will have in the chamber area. But you lose reliability in loading.(jamming problems)
Your barrel will also play a part in how dirty things get. A 218 barrel can have leading problems and will be very accurate . A 224 barrel may not be as accurate but will not have leading problems .

I trust that I have confused everyone reading this.:)

AND yes there is some really bad garbage out there that has no right to exist , but is still being produced and sold.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Alpo mentioned Aguila. I think all of it is made in Mexico, and from my experience, the odor of the propellant gasses makes me think they use donkey crap in their propellant formula. Plus, I've had so many failure-to-fire cartridges that I tried to give a box to my shooting partner. He did not accept it, and we just left it on the range bench as we left. Don't know who picked it up! LOL!
Designer, I agree with what you said about Aguila. It was certainly mal-odorus
along with leaving more residue, both in the chamber area as well as in the barrel so I got an e-Mail address for Aguila and sent some questions about the smell and the fowling in the chamber and barrel. NO RESPONSE. I thought that maybe the mail did not go through; after all Mexico's Internet is not known for its efficiency. Sent a second e-Mail. NOTHING. Being a stubborn old fart I kept sending e-Mails without a response. I probably sent about a dozen e-Mails without a response so I gave up. Too bad for them because now I will not have anything to do with them; their loss - not mine.
 

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On the question on Aquilla ammo. It's all I've bought recently without any failures. Just as dirty as the rest. I found a box of Remington the other day that I bought maybe 40 yrs. ago and they all still worked just as good as new.
 
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