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Hello, I have seen on many threads, on many forums that people are looking to id their US Revolver Co. revolvers. All the S/N that I have seen searched are way higher in number or with letter codes. Mine is a break top, 32 cal. nickel (chrome?) plated, hammered, s/n matching (trigger guard and frame under left grip), 3" barrel. The trigger, mainspring, hammer, cylinder, cam gear, etc all function as far as I can tell.

While it may not be worth it, I would be interested in restoring the finish, replacing the grips (broken during removal) and inspecting for serviceability. Please help
 

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It will help you get answers if you can post some pictures.
 

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Pictures always help!

Iver Johnson (makers of the U.S. Revolver Co. line) used nickel plating on their revolvers. Depending on where you live finding a plating company that will do a firearm could get tricky.
Production of the U.S. Revolver Co. line started in 1910 and went until the 1930's. There were just shy of 170,000 .32 caliber hammer versions made, with .32 cal 3" barrel being the most common.

Grips are fairly common to find on eBay or Numrich (used or reproduction). You'll need a set for the "small frame" and might have to put new holes in them for the locating pin as the pin position varied a bit over the years.

If you choose to have it refinished, the correct finishes for the parts are:
Barrel, cylinder, frame, ejector, ejector rod, hammer pivot screw, trigger pivot pin, trigger guard pin, trigger guard screw, and barrel latch screw are nickel plated.
Hammer, trigger, and barrel latch are color case hardened.
Trigger guard is a blued finish.
Cylinder hand, lifter, and ejector cam I've seen in both blued and color case finishes.

For serviceability, it's best to have a good gunsmith check it out for timing and cylinder gap.

Remember book value on these revolvers is only $220 in 100% original condition. One correctly refinished would be worth maybe $150 tops

If the finish isn't completely destroyed, I tend to be in the camp of "it's only original once, a good scrubbing with BRONZE wool and oil can work wonders". Out of my collection I've only refinished 4 or 5 Ivers and those were either complete mix masters or "bubba" thought he could clean the gun up nice with a sandblaster.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Pictures always help!

Iver Johnson (makers of the U.S. Revolver Co. line) used nickel plating on their revolvers. Depending on where you live finding a plating company that will do a firearm could get tricky.
Production of the U.S. Revolver Co. line started in 1910 and went until the 1930's. There were just shy of 170,000 .32 caliber hammer versions made, with .32 cal 3" barrel being the most common.

Grips are fairly common to find on eBay or Numrich (used or reproduction). You'll need a set for the "small frame" and might have to put new holes in them for the locating pin as the pin position varied a bit over the years.

If you choose to have it refinished, the correct finishes for the parts are:
Barrel, cylinder, frame, ejector, ejector rod, hammer pivot screw, trigger pivot pin, trigger guard pin, trigger guard screw, and barrel latch screw are nickel plated.
Hammer, trigger, and barrel latch are color case hardened.
Trigger guard is a blued finish.
Cylinder hand, lifter, and ejector cam I've seen in both blued and color case finishes.

For serviceability, it's best to have a good gunsmith check it out for timing and cylinder gap.

Remember book value on these revolvers is only $220 in 100% original condition. One correctly refinished would be worth maybe $150 tops

If the finish isn't completely destroyed, I tend to be in the camp of "it's only original once, a good scrubbing with BRONZE wool and oil can work wonders". Out of my collection I've only refinished 4 or 5 Ivers and those were either complete mix masters or "bubba" thought he could clean the gun up nice with a sandblaster.

Thank you. I thought I saw that the line started much earlier. but it's good to know.
 

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While it may not be worth it, I would be interested in restoring the finish, replacing the grips (broken during removal)
Kiana,
The reason that most grips get broken upon removal is because they are removed incorrectly. When removing grips from a revolver, don't try to pull the grip off. Insert a very thin blade, like an exact knife, at the bottom of the grip next to the locating pin. Gently pry straight up.
If you notice, you will see that most broken grips are broke at the locating pin.
Just thought I'd pass this along!
Old Gun Guy
 

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Thank you. I thought I saw that the line started much earlier. but it's good to know.
I missed where you had the SN in the thread title. Your revolver was made in 1911.

Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works started in 1871 (as Johnson & Bye). The Safety Automatic line of revolvers started in late 1893. The U.S. Revolver line as I mentioned before started in 1910. The line originally came about as a way for Iver Johnson to use up leftover parts from the 2nd Model Safety Automatic line that was discontinued in 1908.
 
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