The Firearms Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was recently given a type 99 arisaka barreled action, and a few other loose parts, and it's supposedly chambered in 30-06. This made me think it might have been from south Korea, but the steel finish is throwing me through a loop. All serial numbers and Japanese markings are on the rifle short of the chrysanthemum seal. It wasn't ground off like some rifles, it was just never there.

Any information about where it might've come from or why it's either stainless steel or just unfinished would be great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,001 Posts
I do know there were some that never had a mum but I also think they were devoid of arsenal markings also. I may be wrong about that. It is also likely it is just a very good grind and polish job. None were ever made from stainless steel. Rechambering a 7.7 to 30-06 isn't a good idea as the bullets are different diameters. The government did rechamber some but accuracy wasn't good. Post pics of the mum area and maybe we can tell if it was polished off or was never there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do know there were some that never had a mum but I also think they were devoid of arsenal markings also. I may be wrong about that. It is also likely it is just a very good grind and polish job. None were ever made from stainless steel. Rechambering a 7.7 to 30-06 isn't a good idea as the bullets are different diameters. The government did rechamber some but accuracy wasn't good. Post pics of the mum area and maybe we can tell if it was polished off or was never there.
There is still an arsenal marking on the side of t
Nickel Household hardware Cylinder Bicycle part Metal

Wood Cylinder Nickel Gas Metal

Wood Household hardware Bicycle part Rim Nickel

Wood Door Household hardware Door handle Metal

he receiver. I was able to find reference to someone else that also had a steel finish, but there wasn't anything about why it was like that. I also used 7.7 snap cap, and it seemed to chamber perfectly, but I'm gonna get it checked out by a gunsmith just to make sure. And yeah, I'll post pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,001 Posts
Somebody may correct me but I believe its an early type 99 made at the Kokura arsenal. It would have had a mum so somebody polished out where it was ground off. The steel finish is nothing more than somebody took the bluing off. You just received part of somebody's project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Somebody may correct me but I believe its an early type 99 made at the Kokura arsenal. It would have had a mum so somebody polished out where it was ground off. The steel finish is nothing more than somebody took the bluing off. You just received part of somebody's project.
Ok, that would clear a lot of it up. Thank you, I appreciate the help.

Ok, that would clear a lot of it up. Thank you, I appreciate the help.
I should also say that whoever polished out the finish did a really good job at it. I've looked over it a few times, and there isn't a trace of blueing left on it. Even on hard to get areas and small spaces like on the rear sight, the bolt rails, and threading on the screw holes and screws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,001 Posts
I should also say that whoever polished out the finish did a really good job at it. I've looked over it a few times, and there isn't a trace of blueing left on it. Even on hard to get areas and small spaces like on the rear sight, the bolt rails, and threading on the screw holes and screws.
They probably soaked it something to remove it. Even vinegar will remove bluing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
Some were nade and chambered in 30-06 because in the closing months of the war ... ammo supplies and supply lines were getting sketchy ... these were to be used with captured enemy 30-06 ammo ... last ditch no surrender .
I'm sure these are not that common .
Gary
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,282 Posts
The 30/06 rifles were deeply stamped "US CAL 30" on the left receiver rail under the dust cover groove. I can see bluing on the barrel just behind the rear sight, and in the dust cover rails. It's had a lot of time with a buffing wheel getting prepped for a re-blue. If a chamber cast confirms it's been reamed to 30/06, it's going to be a reloading proposition to get any accuracy from it. Dies and .311 caliber bullets are available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
The 30/06 rifles were deeply stamped "US CAL 30" on the left receiver rail under the dust cover groove. I can see bluing on the barrel just behind the rear sight, and in the dust cover rails. It's had a lot of time with a buffing wheel getting prepped for a re-blue. If a chamber cast confirms it's been reamed to 30/06, it's going to be a reloading proposition to get any accuracy from it. Dies and .311 caliber bullets are available.
7.7 mm is approximately .303 Cal, Thats' .005 smaller than a 30 cal .308 bullet. The Mum on top of the receiver were designated Japanese Imperial Guard rifles, not many of the rank and file issued combat rifles had the Mum. But as far as strength? P.O. Ackley did the blow-up test.

When P.O. Ackley did blow-up tests on military actions he could not blow the Arisaka. He finally loaded a round so hot it squirted the barrel out the front of the receiver but the action was still serviceable. If the barrel and chamber are properly fitted and headspaced it will be a very safe rifle to shoot. Just MHO.

I owned one back in the 60's Mine had a short action, Chambered in 300 Savage. It kicked like a beast, but never failed. in The 70's I had it re-barreled (McGowen) toa 280 rem (7mm Express rem). Fine shooter, The action was not that great, but was reliable. again, mho. And yes, it had the Mum on top of the receiver. There were something like 10 million made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,001 Posts
Some were nade and chambered in 30-06 because in the closing months of the war ... ammo supplies and supply lines were getting sketchy ... these were to be used with captured enemy 30-06 ammo ... last ditch no surrender .
The Mum on top of the receiver were designated Japanese Imperial Guard rifles, not many of the rank and file issued combat rifles had the Mum.
The U.S. government rechambered a lot of them during the Korean war for use by the South Korean Gendarmerie. The mum is the Imperial seal of Japan. It was on all Arisakas not just Imperial Guard rifles.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top