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I am looking at starting to load my own ammo soon, but have a couple questions. First off I have a mix of manufactured brass sitting in containers at home. To load these do I need to know who made these before I reload them? They are all 9mm brass 115 gr. I think, but some are Blazer, Federal, ect. Can I load these all the same or do I have to load them to the specific manufacturer data, therefore wasting the brass I have?

My second question is on crimped primers. All my 5.56 brass is Federal American Eagle. I read that this brass has crimped primers. Is there a special way to remove these primers or do I need certain tools. I saw that some say the crimp isn't tight enough to worry about, that people broke pins decapping, and others say you need like a universal decapping die to get them out and the use the other dies to reload it.

Sorry if this has been asked before. I didn't see the answers I was looking for when I searched the forums.
 

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For 9mm I sort my brass by headstamp, .223 I load unsorted.
I don't inspect my 9mm brass and I like it to all feel the same when reloading, on my press there are 5 things happening at once. With sorted brass if something feels off, something is off. Some brass sizes easier, some primes easier etc.
Are you going to load single stage or progressive? For the first couple of 100 rounds I suggest you do sort brass, just to make it easier on yourself. That way you will not run into berdan or crimped brass or even brass that has a too tight flash hole for the decapping ping.

As for crimped primer pockets on the .222/5.56 don't worry about decapping, it's the priming that is hard or even impossible. This thread should get you going.
It's always good to keep a spare decapping pin on hand though, you may run in to berdan brass.

And welcome to the forums. :)
 

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All 9mm brass will use the same load data. There is no difference in how you load different brands of brass as long as it is 9mm. I load a lot of 9mm and the only sorting I do is to separate brass with crimped primers. All NATO brass will have a cross inside a circle on the head stamp and they will have crimped primers. Those need to have the crimp removed by swaging or reaming before they can be reloaded.

There are many tools available to remove primer crimps. How you remove the crimps is more personal preference than anything else. The price of the various tools varies a lot. The Dillon swage tool will be vary expensive (close to $100) compared to a $2 or $3 counter sink bit. Both will work but the Dillon will be faster. I prefer the RCBS swage tool because it's fast, does a good job, does not remove any metal, and it's not very expensive. So there are lots of ways to remove the crimp you just have to pick one that works for you.
 

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I don't load a lot f .223, but while loading 9MM, the only "culling" I do of the brass is to toss the deformed ones, and keep ALL .380's out of the mix...that can be a spoiler while running a batch thru the 550B...
 

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I don't worry about headstamps on either. Check your 9mm and cull out any that are seriously deformed. I had a bunchof aluminum cases that were berdan primed. Chuck those. If you run across any in brass, it can damage your decapping pin. Whether you use a universal decapping die or the sizing die, iit's up to you. You just need to clean it first if using the sizing die.
As to the crimped primer brass; the crimp needs to come out. They make a swaging tool that will do this without removing any material. They make a crimp removal tool that cuts it out. You can use a case chamfering tool or a countersink from one of the big home repair stores.
 
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