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It's been over a year since I had mine out and then only fired it one other time at the range. This time, at Mr Brady's direction I duplicated the original loads of 150 grain spritzer at 2700fps. I should also let you know this all came about because my daughter invited me to go shooting with her boyfriend and his father. Clearly I was not prepared as I thought I'd be able to use their spotting scope to dial things in........not. So all I was doing was throwing ammo down range at a 200 yard target not knowing where I was hitting. Deciding this was futile so I raised the sight to 600 yards and took a shot at a ram they had at that distance, they/we had a range finder so I know it was at 600 yards. To my surprise I came darn close to getting a hit as evidenced by the puff of dry dirt about 3'-4' above. Hmmmmmmm???? Took another and it hit in the same spot, now I'm getting a bit excited. Decided this was worthy of a few more tries and chambered another, this time aiming at the bottom of the ram. Poof, another puff of smoke just high. Now I'm getting even more excited and chamber another after dropping the sights to the 500 yard notch. I let fly and to my amazement no puff of smoke was seen. "Did I hit it" I asked myself? I got my daughter to watch as I let another fly and sure enough I hit the ram. We went through 30 rounds ringing that 600 yard ram. In the past I've questioned how accurate these 100 year old guns really were at distance, thinking success on the battlefield was more of a volley fire thing but I've seen the light. To me being able to hit a man sized target consistently at 600 yards with iron sights is just amazing. I was using a Speer 2125 bullet which is a boattail spritzer and I wonder if that would effect the sights so much? By that I mean having to drop from the 600 to 500 yard setting. In any event this was sooooo much fun and I'm going to load up the ones I emptied plus another box as I think I've found a good load.

Speer (2125) 150 grain SBT
45.2 grains H4895
CCI 200 Primers

Ps. Apparently I need to invest in a spotting scope so if ya'll have any advice please speak up.

God Bless

Pss. Here are a couple of pictures of the old girl for those that haven't seen it.

View attachment 128878 View attachment 128879
 

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And I still want it!

Some great shooting, did you retrieve the 200 yard target you were shooting at to see if any hits on it?
 
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The bullet on the M1906 cartridge had a flat based 150 (154 grains comes to mind, but...) bullet. The boat tail on the bullet you use might change the trajectory enough to matter at 600 yards. (Probably get a representative of the unholy at 200, though.)

I work with WWI era rifles and find the iron sights were 'adjusted' in terms of windage and elevation to the individual shooter prior to actual use. (At least in theory.) The front sight in most rifles - including the M1917 - can be drifted left and right to center windage. The front sight can be replaced with a taller or shorter post which will then follow the rear sight.

Obviously you didn't check in with the battalion armorer prior to setting out on your excursion. o_O
 

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Obviously you didn't check in with the battalion armorer prior to setting out on your excursion.
Thanks Archie, I do appreciate the info. Maybe my problem lies in that this particular rifle spent some time in the Canadian military and it's confused with having to use the metric system..
 

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Thanks Archie, I do appreciate the info. Maybe my problem lies in that this particular rifle spent some time in the Canadian military and it's confused with having to use the metric system..
I suspect that the thing throwing you off is the 'Battle Sight Zero' factor. Depending on the model, the 'zero' lowest sight setting for the Battle Sight Zero is somewhere around 450 yards. Another thing, maybe why you were 3 or 4 feet over the target at 600 yards - is the type of 'hold' you use when you aim.

A guy I used to shoot with (a former Marine) and an older guy like myself, used an entirely different hold (sight picture when viewing the front sight blade) than what I use. No matter the distance, he used a "6 o'clock hold" (the front sight set at the lower edge of the target circle). I have always used a "center of mass hold" where the bullet will strike right where the tip of my front sight is at my zero range.
 

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I’m with you Jim and we’re in good company. I read one of the books about Carlos Hathcock, I think it was “Silent Warrior”,and in that book he was quoted as saying something to the effect “it never made much sense to him to aim at the bottom of a target. A person should aim where they want to hit”.

I think I’m going to take notes on where it shoots at various distances and stuff the little paper in the hole for the oiler. I don’t get to the rifle range often enough and there’s no way I’d remember. Not sure how but my father still remembers the dope for his M14 in boot camp (Camp Pendleton I think 1963).
 

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I realize this is an old post - but that M1917 is a beautiful rifle. For being an "alternate standard" it was a great weapon. Most of the old movies about WW1 have Army Doughboys using M1903s (the exception was the movie The Lost Battalion with Rick Schrodeer), but in truth most Army personnel were issued the M1917s. The Marine Corps used mostly the M1903s in combat.

Another bit of trivia: The U.S. Armed Forces were integrated before President Wilson - but he (a "Progressive Liberal Democrat") re-segregated it just prior to our entry into WW1. As a matter of fact, many black Army personnel were diverted to French Army Divisions to augment them - rather than have them serve along side of white troops. Our military remained segregated until late in WW2.

Just thought I'd mention it for the benefit of our Liberal Progressive Democrat friends...
 

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Another bit of trivia: The U.S. Armed Forces were integrated before President Wilson - but he (a "Progressive Liberal Democrat") re-segregated it just prior to our entry into WW1. As a matter of fact, many black Army personnel were diverted to French Army Divisions to augment them -
The .303 Ross Model 1905 in our collection had been issued to Company E, 15th Regiment Infantry (Colored) during 1917 while training in NY. As Company E, 369th Infantry they served with French units once overseas.
 

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I just bought a 1917, Eddystone. Good looking metal, as far as I could see without taking it apart. The wood has a lot to be desired. Either shellac or varnish with a lot of dings. I've never done a stock repair, looking at Youtube. I'm guessing boiled linseed oil is the proper finish? I'm travelling right now, it'll be a while before I can get started. Priced a new stock, nearly as much as I paid for the rifle.
 

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I want one!
Beautiful.
I got a Eddystone but it is NO WAY as nice as Firpo's . Think it still has the scratches from France on it . Wow 600 yards that's good shooting . I don't think I have shot over 200 yards in my life . Having to try and do that with people around my knees would start shaking . I don't get far from my little 50 yard range on my place and have gotten lazy . Try smaller targets sometimes but not the same as trying to reach out and touch someone . :bowdown: .
 

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I just bought a 1917, Eddystone. Good looking metal, as far as I could see without taking it apart. The wood has a lot to be desired. Either shellac or varnish with a lot of dings. I've never done a stock repair, looking at Youtube. I'm guessing boiled linseed oil is the proper finish? I'm travelling right now, it'll be a while before I can get started. Priced a new stock, nearly as much as I paid for the rifle.
If you are looking for a stock, keep this in mind: these rifles were made at Winchester, Eddystone or Remington. At the very tip of the stock, each manufacturer stamped the wood with "W". "E" or "R". I bought a replacemenmt stock for an M1917 once from Gunparts Corp. It was a great stock, and I specified "E" for it and that's what they sent me. Not all that pricey, either.
 

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Evidently I missed this thread first time around. I'm also in the BLO camp.

Mark, that's great about hitting a target at 600 and especially with irons. It can also be done and done consistently with black powder, cast bullets and iron sights...and a lot farther than 600 yards. So can your 1917. It's a hoot, ain't it!!!!!!
 
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