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Need to have value for a 1917 Enfield with serial number142xxx. Looks like original condition but do not know what to look for to value this rifle. Pictures attached give idea of configuration and condition. Need to sell this rifle so have to have idea on what sale price should be set.
 

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Need to have value for a 1917 Enfield with serial number142xxx. Looks like original condition but do not know what to look for to value this rifle. Pictures attached give idea of configuration and condition. Need to sell this rifle so have to have idea on what sale price should be set.
Thats a tough on wish I could help. Weapon looks like its in very good shape for the age.
Is there a number you would share for what you have into it? I do know in my search for an original Springfield they are running between 1000. and 2000. Have not seen much on Enfield and not sure there is a comparison on the costs I have found for the Springfields.
Have you checked *********.com just to see if similar are posted there? That is usually the first place I start just to see.

Would you consider that a carbine??

 

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OK just checked ********* for S&G,s saw one remington 1917 looks like the full version, by pictures yours looks like cut down or carbine. imo. but that one on ********* is asking for starting bid of 650.00 . The rest look like sporterized which makes me sick. I am more of a purest when it comes to vintage Mil. weapons. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thats a tough on wish I could help. Weapon looks like its in very good shape for the age.
Is there a number you would share for what you have into it? I do know in my search for an original Springfield they are running between 1000. and 2000. Have not seen much on Enfield and not sure there is a comparison on the costs I have found for the Springfields.
Have you checked *********.com just to see if similar are posted there? That is usually the first place I start just to see.
Have checked *********.com and they show a large range of prices. Do not know how to grade this rifle properly. Has been in storage for a long long time and pictures show very dirty stock. Not sure if I should clean it up and if so, what to use on the stock.
 

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But yours is a Remington correct? Not a Winchester?


Have checked *********.com and they show a large range of prices. Do not know how to grade this rifle properly. Has been in storage for a long long time and pictures show very dirty stock. Not sure if I should clean it up and if so, what to use on the stock.
I have always felt it is better to leave the piece as is until your research is complete, for most value as far as I am concerned is in a piece as original as possible, sometimes we can screw the value if we try and improve the looks. jmo.
 

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It is a good looking rifle and in good shape from what I can see. It is not a "carbine" since there is no carbine model of the P17 and is does not look to be cut down. I have seen them going for anywhere from $400 all the way up to close to $1000. This is just my opinion but I feel that one could be worth about that $650 mark that was mentioned.
 

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A cut rifle is a cut rifle. There were no U.S. Model of 1917 "Carbines". You want to look for the rifle being completely intact. The front sight protector should have an "R" stamped on it. The front end of the stock should also have an "R" stamped into the very end or tip of the stock.

Over the past couple of decades, many of the U.S. rifles used overseas were re-imported. These will have 'Import "stamps" usually located on the front end of the barrel. These markings are not popular with collectors, and will usually reduce the value by a hundred dollars or more.

The stock itself should have Arsenal stamps on it. I couldn't see from the pictures, but if it went thru an Arsenal rebuild - there will be a stamp on the left side indicating a rebuild and where it was done. Going from memory (my rifle is down in the vault), there will be a "P" in a circle on the bottom of the stock by the grip, and there will be an "Eagle's Head" stamp just ahead of the magazine floorplate.

These were made by Remington ("R" stamps), Eddystone ("E") and Winchester ("W" stamps). Look at the interior of the barrel (the bore). The bore should be clean and bright, and the twists (rifling) should be crisp and sharp. These rifles were used at a time when corrosive ammunition was used - so bore condition is critical. Generally speaking, the order of desirability is 1.) Winchester, 2.) Remington and last 3.) the Eddystone. The spread that I've seen isn't really much - maybe $100 to $200. Also generally, the prices I've noted at Gun Shows runs between $600 and $850 for complete, original 1917s. Your rifle looks to be (exterior) in at least "average" condition. I would estimate right in at $650 in value.

Just so you know - there were far more Model of 1917s issued to the Doughboys in WW1 for front line service than the U.S. Model of 1903 (Springfield and Rock Island). The Army used mainly the 1917s while the Marine Corps used mostly the '03s.
 

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The M17 has a myriad of proof and acceptance marks all over. Here's a link to a site that shows just where to look for them:

http://m1903.com/m1917markings.htm

For a very interesting and in depth article about the M17 you might want to check this out:

http://m1903.com/m1917markings.htm

I'm currently restoring an Eddystone model to it's proper appearance, replacing a sporterized stock and missing hardware.
 
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The M17 has a myriad of proof and acceptance marks all over. Here's a link to a site that shows just where to look for them:

http://m1903.com/m1917markings.htm

For a very interesting and in depth article about the M17 you might want to check this out:

http://m1903.com/m1917markings.htm

I'm currently restoring an Eddystone model to it's proper appearance, replacing a sporterized stock and missing hardware.
I did the same thing with an Eddystone some years back. I found a correct Eddystone stock from Saarco. Took two tries - the first one they sent was a Winchester stock - but the second turned out to be Eddystone. Again - look at the forward/tip of the stock. They are clearly stamped by the maker.

The bayonets are another story. I've got one that was produced for the British - then re-struck with U.S. markings.
 
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