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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all solved one "project" now on to the next. I have an old 410. a Western Field Model 15 made by Mossberg for Wards. The Mossberg equivalent is the model 80 or 83, the 80 I believe, is 2 3/4 in chamber the 83 I believe is 3 in. chamber. Any way the trigger pin caused the trigger to elongate so I need a new trigger.

I'm looking for a source or someone who can make or repair the one I have.

Also I am interested in a stock for the same gun. The stock cracked years ago.

I tried Numrich they are out of stock. And Jack First Guns does not make the part.

Any ideas anyone??

Thanx - Phil
 

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You already tried my idea. There's another but I can't think of it off the top of my head. When I do, I'll post it.
 

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I wish you luck... Your gun is in the neighborhood of 75 years old or older. I did a a pretty exhaustive search online, and there just aren't many parts available for them. It is a slick looking gun and it might be worth making the part yourself. No special tool or skills required. It can be done with a drill (a press would be better), a vice, a hacksaw, and files (or a Dremel). It's time consuming, but not hard. You say "elongated"... The trigger itself, or the pivot hole? If the trigger itself is elongated, you might try heating it, bending it back to shape, and re-tempering it.

The stock repair should be pretty straight forward. Depending on how long the crack is, drill along the crack, pin it with dowels, glue it, and clamp it. To have a gunsmith do all this would cost much more than the gun is worth, but if you have the time, it might be worth doing yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wish you luck... Your gun is in the neighborhood of 75 years old or older. I did a a pretty exhaustive search online, and there just aren't many parts available for them. It is a slick looking gun and it might be worth making the part yourself. No special tool or skills required. It can be done with a drill (a press would be better), a vice, a hacksaw, and files (or a Dremel). It's time consuming, but not hard. You say "elongated"... The trigger itself, or the pivot hole? If the trigger itself is elongated, you might try heating it, bending it back to shape, and re-tempering it.

The stock repair should be pretty straight forward. Depending on how long the crack is, drill along the crack, pin it with dowels, glue it, and clamp it. To have a gunsmith do all this would cost much more than the gun is worth, but if you have the time, it might be worth doing yourself.
Hello Dave_H,

Yea, This gun is more a sentimental piece than anything. I believe it belonged to my Grandfather, then pasted through my Dad to me. The hole in the trigger or trigger pin hole is actually sort of football shaped from years of use.

I have thought about welding the whole shut then redrilling and grinding off the excess my only concern is the hardness and getting it back at least close so it lasts another 75+ years.

The stock is a different animal. Years ago, more than I care to remember, we pulled the gun out to go pheasant hunting and the stock had split from the magazine to the business end of the gun stalk. We have used it like that.

I have thought of gluing and clamping it. Although it is significant maybe between an 1/8th and 1/4in at the widest. And there is a reason it split. I am worried it may re-split after gluing. I thought if I could find another stock I could use it and keep the original I would still have all of the original gun.

This is a fun gun to shoot and you have to aim right on to take down big fowl like pheasant it doesn't have that many pellets. Thinking back I NEVER missed/lost a bird I shot at with that gun. In fact once I was in a line of about 10 folks driving a cotton field. They had me on the end so I didn't have to worry about anyone to my left. A big old cock pheasant came up right in the middle of the group and four others shot at it and didn't slow it down even a little. When it crossed my path I downed it hard with one shot! It was almost out of range to boot. I got a LOT of complements on the shot.

When I graduated to the 12 gage I can't make that same claim. Although I took more chances so maybe it washes in the end!!
 

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Your plan for the trigger is good, but you are right, it will anneal the metal. You will have to harden and temper it again. Here I will say I am neither a gunsmith nor a metallurgist, so I make no guarantees on this process, but I have seen my granddad do it. It takes a bit of explaining, so it is easier to refer you to a video. This YouTube does a good job, "HOW TO HARDEN A KNIFE BLADE". For your trigger, a propane torch will suffice. This hardens it. Tempering is easy, just put your hardened trigger in the oven, pre-heated to 450 to bring the trigger up to 450. Then turn the oven off, and let it slow cool in the oven.

The stock sounds bad, but it's not as bad as it sounds. Just gluing would not work. That is why I suggested dowels. You might want to cure the stock in an oven at low heat to draw out excess oil that might prevent the glue from adhering. A furniture dowel has a screw like groove in it to retain the glue. For the forearm, you will probably want a 5/16" dowel. Drill a hole that is the same size as the dowel. The dowel should not slip in; you should have to tap it in. Glue and clamp the stock, and drill your dowel holes. I would suggest 3 or 4 depending on how long the crack is. Cover your dowels in glue, and tap them into the holes. Allow to cure, and, after finishing the dowels down, your stock should be serviceable. This is a repair I have done, though the crack was not as bad as yours sounds. Still, it should work for you. As I said, I am not a gunsmith, so if anyone sees a problem with my advice, please comment.
 
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Sorry Dave, but I had to enlarge the font in your above post so I could see it.
 

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Sorry Dave, but I had to enlarge the font in your above post so I could see it.
Hmmmm.... Don't know what I did wrong, I didn't modify the font, except on the link, which when I pasted it, came up in headline. Sorry, I'll preview before posting.
 

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If you weld the hole shut & redrill....heat the part and then quench in oil to temper or harden it.....Hey, I learnt dat watching "Forged in Fire". Heck, it's on TV, it's 'gotta be true.
 

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If you weld the hole shut & redrill....heat the part and then quench in oil to temper or harden it.....Hey, I learnt dat watching "Forged in Fire". Heck, it's on TV, it's 'gotta be true.
Well, as I said, I have seen my grandfather do it. He was from a family of blacksmiths. I linked one video, but there is no dearth to choose from. I asked for correction if my advice was wrong, not outright ridicule without rhyme or reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Your plan for the trigger is good, but you are right, it will anneal the metal. You will have to harden and temper it again. Here I will say I am neither a gunsmith nor a metallurgist, so I make no guarantees on this process, but I have seen my granddad do it. It takes a bit of explaining, so it is easier to refer you to a video. This YouTube does a good job, "HOW TO HARDEN A KNIFE BLADE". For your trigger, a propane torch will suffice. This hardens it. Tempering is easy, just put your hardened trigger in the oven, pre-heated to 450 to bring the trigger up to 450. Then turn the oven off, and let it slow cool in the oven.

The stock sounds bad, but it's not as bad as it sounds. Just gluing would not work. That is why I suggested dowels. You might want to cure the stock in an oven at low heat to draw out excess oil that might prevent the glue from adhering. A furniture dowel has a screw like groove in it to retain the glue. For the forearm, you will probably want a 5/16" dowel. Drill a hole that is the same size as the dowel. The dowel should not slip in; you should have to tap it in. Glue and clamp the stock, and drill your dowel holes. I would suggest 3 or 4 depending on how long the crack is. Cover your dowels in glue, and tap them into the holes. Allow to cure, and, after finishing the dowels down, your stock should be serviceable. This is a repair I have done, though the crack was not as bad as yours sounds. Still, it should work for you. As I said, I am not a gunsmith, so if anyone sees a problem with my advice, please comment.
Thanx Again for the info Dave_H,

I have done some forging in the past. There was a more precise video shown on the right of the video you listed that had the temper scale shown about the 3:30 minute mark.

I have an old 250 Amp stick welder and acetylene torch but the Stick welder doesn't have the control I would like to close the hole. A MIG, which I don't have, would have more control and be much better for the purpose. Then tempering would finish the job nicely.

Pinning the stock certainly would do the job I would just like to make it less visible from the outside. I have thought of a couple of half blind butterfly dove tail jointerys that is within my capability. It could be seen from inside the stock but not outside. Here is a link to what I'am talking about if not on a much larger scale.

Thanx Again for the input some good ideas there!

- Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you weld the hole shut & redrill....heat the part and then quench in oil to temper or harden it.....Hey, I learnt dat watching "Forged in Fire". Heck, it's on TV, it's 'gotta be true.
Hello ShootBrownelK,
I love that show wished I had a shop big enough to add forging equipment. I always loved doing that. There is just something about working steel that brings out the testosterone in me... HAHA!
 

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Pinning the stock certainly would do the job I would just like to make it less visible from the outside. I have thought of a couple of half blind butterfly dove tail jointerys that is within my capability. It could be seen from inside the stock but not outside. Here is a link to what I'am talking about if not on a much larger scale.

Thanx Again for the input some good ideas there!

- Phil[/QUOTE]

Thanks Phil, I am very familiar with the technique. Very elegant solution. There is no doubt the dowels woulod show no matter how you finished them. I am more comfortable with metal. The blacksmithing gene skipped a couple of generations. My Grand-dad left the farm and smithy behind, eventually becoming a carpenter, as was my Dad. I am a fair hand with a lot of carpentry, but never had the patience for cabinetry. Odd, considering that I can do pretty much what I want with metal.
 
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If you're going to fill, redrill and temper the pin hole, do you have the measurements to locate the hole.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If you're going to fill, redrill and temper the pin hole, do you have the measurements to locate the hole.
I do not have the exact position. I was going to make a duplicate with maybe plastic. Then using the least worn side of the original trigger hole and the appropriate size drill, drill the hole in the duplicate. Then use the duplicate as a templet guide to re-drill the hole on my drill press once the original was filled in.

That of course would be unless someone has the drawing for the part?? Would you happen to know anyone that has access to the drawing?

I never thought of just getting some tool steel and fabricating one from scratch....

Thanx for the reply,

- Phil
 
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