What is a good place to start collecting C&R?

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics Forum' started by flannelman, Apr 20, 2009.

  1. flannelman

    flannelman New Member

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    What is a good starter for a novice in the C&R arena? I used to have an old military bolt gun, I don't even know what it was but it had a really nice original stock. Well I traded it for a 20 ga and a toolbox and I wish I hadn't done it now. The only gun I ever let go. Anyway what would be a good one to start with? How do I find a good one? And what is a good price? I'd like to start at the less expensive end and work my way up.
     
  2. Dakota Red 1

    Dakota Red 1 New Member

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    Do you have the C&R FFL or are you buying through a local gun shop? If you have a C&R, some of the dealers will send you their sales circulars when you send them a copy of your C&R. Those are fun. Or else you can do a search for "C&R guns" and check out dealer sites. Some of them won't list prices though. They are wholesalers and want you to send in your FFL and get a password to see them.

    Starting at the low end there are still a gob of Mosin Nagant rifles out there for $70 or $80. I am very happy with the two 91/30s I've got. Then I got a Tokarev pistol to keep them company for $200. Wanted a Mauser action so I got a Yugoslavian 24/47. You can still get them for +/- $150. They are nice rifles. I have a Swiss K31 which is well made and very accurate. SMLEs can be found for less than $200.

    Ammo is cheap and plentiful for all of the above. A couple more pistols for under $200 are CZ52s and CZ82s and you can get a Model 1895 Nagant revolver for $70 or $80. Ammo for it is more than $20/box though. There are a lot of Steyr M95 carbines out there but they need the stripper clip to feed from the magazine and those can be tough to find.

    Prices are good for whatever is currently flooding the market and go up as the supply drops. I have dealt with J&G Sales and Southern Ohio Gun and have no complaints although there are others that I would buy from. Classic Arms Inc. has a good web site. C&R guns can be found on the auction sites also. I enjoy these old war horses and am always planning what to get. A Swedish Mauser or a Finnish Mosin Nagant might be next. I hope you have fun with whatever you get---Mike
     

  3. flannelman

    flannelman New Member

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    Thanks for the info. I havent gotten a C&R FFL yet but I have been looking into it. It is nice to know there are a lot of options out there.
     
  4. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    I agree that Mosin Nagants are a good place to start. Then you just keep going and never stop.
     
  5. flannelman

    flannelman New Member

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    That is great cause I have wanted to pick up a Mosin for a while but I just never have. What is the best way to find a good one? I don't know a lot about them.
     
  6. Dakota Red 1

    Dakota Red 1 New Member

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    Most of what the dealers have are arsenal refinished. The blued metal is blue, the bright metal is shiny and the stocks have been repaired where necessary and given a fresh coat of something... I think shellac. Bores are usually good with some of them being darkened by corrosive ammo. Here are a couple of places that have loads of info:http://7.62x54r.net/ http://mosinnagant.net/default.asp there are others.

    Here is something about my two 91/30s: the second one, my son's, is pre-war. It was made in 1937 at the Izhevsk arsenal. The workmanship is very nice on this rifle. The first one, mine, was made in the same arsenal but during the height of the war, 1943. It looks like it was made in a hurry by shell-shocked, one armed veterans on a vodka binge. Fit and finish indicates that there was a shortage of abrasives finer than 60 grit. But it is the better shooter of the two. I'll keep it.

    One of the many things I've learned from polishshooter, a member here, is that if your Russian rifle doesn't shoot well, sell it and get another.

    I would suggest finding one from an online dealer and having a local FFL holder do the transfer. The ones I have seen in sporting goods stores are marked up too high.
     
  7. Helix_FR

    Helix_FR Active Member

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    I've had my C&R for a while now and have collected a number of surplus rifles and pistols. My advice is get what interest you. Mosins are a good start, lots of them out there, good price and tons of parts, surplus ammo is easy to find, but if your not really interested in buying one (even though it seems that you are) then get what you like. I don't even own a mosin. I've seen them, shot them, they are nice but they never really spiked my interest. Its an addicting hobby and you'll find yourself either collecting as many as 1 type as you can or getting more and more obscure as time goes on. I started with a Jap type 38 then it when to a type 99, then I moved to the enfields etc, etc ,etc. Now I have a French MAS 36 that really not many people know much about it and parts are about impossible to find. The funny thing is that some of the more obscure guns aren't worth much. I picked up an Italian Carcano Calvery Carbine for 100bucks. Its like new and shoots really good. Ammo is hard to find however.
    Good luck and happy hunting, its fun to get into surplus especially when you find something that has a lot of history, just be prepared to be broke:D
     
  8. flannelman

    flannelman New Member

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    I'm broke anyway so that would be nothing new. What about reloading? Can you reload for thee old guns?
     
  9. Dakota Red 1

    Dakota Red 1 New Member

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    Sure, most if not all of the foreign military ammo is not easy to reload though. Hard to decap and hard to find primers for. Commercial brass can be found for many of these calibers but is sometimes expensive. I have bought Wolf Gold ammo for some of my rifles. It is boxer primed and brass cased and can be re-loaded.
     
  10. Helix_FR

    Helix_FR Active Member

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    Reloading for some of these old boys is part of the fun. Yes you can reload and some calibers its the only way to go. Commercial ammo is just not easy to find for some. Be careful with trying to reload surplus ammo. Some are steel cases, some are berden primed (boxer primed is what your looking for) some are corrosive ammo and some just isn't safe at all.
    7.62X54r is not to terribly hard to find so reloading for it can be a 50/50. Some others like the 7.7 Jap, 7.5 carcano and the 7.5 MAS will put you in the poor house quickly if you don't reload for them.
     
  11. momo

    momo Former Guest

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    Try and get a C&R if you can, it will save on the transfer fees. I agree the Mosin Nagants are a good place to start, you can get them for 70 bucks and up. After that get what interests you.
     
  12. flannelman

    flannelman New Member

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    I'm going to get the info on a C&R lic and get one. My brother really likes old millitary rifles so he will probably start collecting with me. I like the idea of getting discounts on stuff too!
     
  13. gandog56

    gandog56 Member

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    Reloading is about the only way I can aford to shoot my Steyr M95 8X56R. But it is probably still cheaper to buy milsurp stuff for most calibers. Not that I still don't reload all of them for high accuracy loads.
     
  14. mauser655

    mauser655 New Member

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    Best place to start is at a Roses store when Bush 1 was president. There was a surge of C&R military rifles coming into the country and prices were low.
    Getting a C&R license can be a good idea. But then you have the government knowing even more about you. Gun Shows can be good places to look. Sometimes you can find good deals. Online gets pricy when you have to ship to an FFL for the transfer bit some good deals there too.