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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
i just made this account to ask a question about a shotgun I purchased at a yard sale for $15. The condition it’s in it’s defiantly a wall hanger. It says
“Clark & Sneider” below the firing pins and has
“Clark and Sneider, Baltimore MD” on the barrel.
it’s also has “156” on the handle on the stock maybe the serial number?
barrel length is 28” 10 or 12 gage.
any info on what it’s worth or how old it is would help. I don’t know much about guns and what blueing is but wood looks like 60% barrel is at like 40% very very rusty.
if you need any more info or more pictures I will gladly post.

image.jpg

image.jpg

250970

250971
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Open it upand take the barrels off. Are there any markings on the water table?
I don’t know what the water table is. But here’s a picture. It says 156 which matched the number on the stock leading me to believe it’s the serial number? So it’s complete set.
250972

250973

this is the only marking on the barrel. It’s on the top and says “Clark & Sneider . Baltimore MD”
250974
 

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If you use Google to find Clark & Sneider, Baltimore MD, you'll find several auction sites listing these. The company appears to have been active around 1880 to 1889, and the values asked are surprisingly high. It's missing the forend piece, and should not be fired with modern ammo. That Damascus barrel will not like it. One site I looked at is Pook & Pook, Inc. Who names these companies, anyway? They expected to get between $300 and $500, and ended up at $360 for a piece in similar condition, but with all the parts. Interesting! Thanks for sharing the pics; maybe I should go to more yard sales!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you use Google to find Clark & Sneider, Baltimore MD, you'll find several auction sites listing these. The company appears to have been active around 1880 to 1889, and the values asked are surprisingly high. It's missing the forend piece, and should not be fired with modern ammo. That Damascus barrel will not like it. One site I looked at is Pook & Pook, Inc. Who names these companies, anyway? They expected to get between $300 and $500, and ended up at $360 for a piece in similar condition, but with all the parts. Interesting! Thanks for sharing the pics; maybe I should go to more yard sales!
Thank you! Very helpful. And you defiantly should go to some yard sales, you’ll never know what you’ll find. The guy had one more antique gun for sale. It was a .22 rifle not as old though maybe I should have bought it as well. He was selling the Clark and Sneider for $20 got him down to $15. The man told me he got it from a storage locker auction.
 

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That was a well-made, very nice gun at one time. The engraving is top notch.
While the barrels are probably damascus steel, I see no indication of it in the pictures.
BTW- the water table is the flat on the action, not the barrels.
 

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If you use Google to find Clark & Sneider, Baltimore MD, you'll find several auction sites listing these. The company appears to have been active around 1880 to 1889, and the values asked are surprisingly high. It's missing the forend piece, and should not be fired with modern ammo. That Damascus barrel will not like it. One site I looked at is Pook & Pook, Inc. Who names these companies, anyway? They expected to get between $300 and $500, and ended up at $360 for a piece in similar condition, but with all the parts. Interesting! Thanks for sharing the pics; maybe I should go to more yard sales!
Heck ya, I woold have bought it just for a wallhanger too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That was a well-made, very nice gun at one time. The engraving is top notch.
While the barrels are probably damascus steel, I see no indication of it in the pictures.
BTW- the water table is the flat on the action, not the barrels.
Is this the water bed? There is writing and numbers here.
250993

is say C.E Sneider serial #156 again and
“68 PAT 74”
 

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yes , "spun" ,"twist" and "Damascus" are indeed the same , spun may be a geographical term as its what my grandfather called them , pretty dangerous the older they get , spun and twist has to do with the way the barrel is produced which is a historical disaster , they are known to go cabloowie (technical term) , the way i understand it its the manufacture process that was used in making the barrels makes the barrels degrade over time , basically they have a low count finite number of shots before catastrophic failure
 

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yes , "spun" ,"twist" and "Damascus" are indeed the same , spun may be a geographical term as its what my grandfather called them , pretty dangerous the older they get , spun and twist has to do with the way the barrel is produced which is a historical disaster , they are known to go cabloowie (technical term) , the way i understand it its the manufacture process that was used in making the barrels makes the barrels degrade over time , basically they have a low count finite number of shots before catastrophic failure
You keep right on believin' that, please. Leaves more for those of us who know better. For a complete failure it sure held its own for about 70 years, rifle and shotguns, being successful in muzzleloaders and on into cartridges arms. England, Germany, Belgium, France and the US used Damascus barrels in some of the finest firearms ever produced. There's a lengthy series of articles in "The Double Gun Journal", the premier shotgun periodical in the US, of lengthy tests with those dangerous old barrels. Seems the 10 guns they used in various degrees of condition, some as new, others "goosey loose", all digested two modern Remington proof loads with no adverse effects or additional loosening of the action. I personally know of a few British double guns and one double rifle that have been returned to England for re-proof at the Birmingham Proof House, I believe. They all passed and are now proofed for modern smokeless loads.

I'm no authority by any stretch of the imagination but no sir, they are not "indeed the same". There was/is several different methods of making twist, Damascus, laminate barrels. Some better than others.

The Ithaca Crass had laminate barrels but I don't remember if the Flues ever did. I'm thinking not. It's 1912 introduction date might preclude that.
 

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You keep right on believin' that, please. Leaves more for those of us who know better. For a complete failure it sure held its own for about 70 years, rifle and shotguns, being successful in muzzleloaders and on into cartridges arms. England, Germany, Belgium, France and the US used Damascus barrels in some of the finest firearms ever produced. There's a lengthy series of articles in "The Double Gun Journal", the premier shotgun periodical in the US, of lengthy tests with those dangerous old barrels. Seems the 10 guns they used in various degrees of condition, some as new, others "goosey loose", all digested two modern Remington proof loads with no adverse effects or additional loosening of the action. I personally know of a few British double guns and one double rifle that have been returned to England for re-proof at the Birmingham Proof House, I believe. They all passed and are now proofed for modern smokeless loads.

I'm no authority by any stretch of the imagination but no sir, they are not "indeed the same". There was/is several different methods of making twist, Damascus, laminate barrels. Some better than others.

The Ithaca Crass had laminate barrels but I don't remember if the Flues ever did. I'm thinking not. It's 1912 introduction date might preclude that.
i will trust my grandfathers advice over yours so i certainly will keep on believing it , just because you get away with shooting higher pressured loads a couple times in no way means that the next time you're not going to be staring at a barrel peel , personally i believe spun barrel shotguns are wall hangers , but its your face ,not mine so by all means do what you will with it , peace out
 
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