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This sm revolver has no markings that I can find. Got it at an antique fair cause it was small & cute :), fit nicely in my hand, & I may pass it to a relative. I was able to cock it & fire it, but it sometimes sticks & some guy told me it wasn't really functional cause you can roll the cylinder instead of it stopping (or something like that):eek:. I'll have to let the pix say the rest since I don't know much about guns. BTW, what are the rules or laws for buying guns at antique shows? And shipping them? Or taking them on a plane? Tnx! BTW I posted 4 pix but see only one in the Preview. Will post & see if the others appear. NEWBIES:rolleyes:
 

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Looks to me to be French. French copy of a British gun. But without proof marks (and you say it has no markings of any sort) there's really no telling.

Value - very little. Maybe 50 bucks as a display piece, in a shadow box, or framed and under glass hanging on the wall.

Rules for buying guns at an antique show. Depends on where you are at. There are Federal rules, but then each state has their own rules. Federally, if you are 18 or older, you can buy a gun from someone who is NOT a Federally Licensed Dealer. If he IS (that is referred to as being an FFL), you must be 21 to buy a pistol, but you can still buy a rifle or shotgun at 18. A lot depends on what state you are a resident of, also. You can only buy from a non-FFL in your state of residence. So, if you live in Georgia, and are at an antique show in Alabama, you cannot legally buy a gun there.

UNLESS the gun was made before 1899. And you can prove it was made before 1899. Guns made in 1898 or earlier are, by Federal definition, antiques and not firearms, and Federal gun laws don't effect them. Your gun, since there is no makers name or serial number, you can't really tell whether it was made in 1850 or yesterday. Legally you could not buy that out of state.

Some states have laws that are more stringent than Federal laws. That's why it depends on where you are.

Shipping a gun. If it is a rifle or shotgun, it can be mailed or sent FedEx or UPS. If it is a pistol, you cannot mail it, and it can only go FedEx or UPS. Those two nice companies know you have to send it through them, and so know they have you by the short hairs, and charge out the wazoo. 75 to 100 bucks, normally.

Take it on the airplane. The only way to legally take a gun on the airplane is in checked baggage. If you try to take it in carryon, or just wear it on your belt, they will arrest you and put you in jail for a long time.
 

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This sm revolver has no markings that I can find. Got it at an antique fair cause it was small & cute :), fit nicely in my hand, & I may pass it to a relative. I was able to cock it & fire it, but it sometimes sticks & some guy told me it wasn't really functional cause you can roll the cylinder instead of it stopping (or something like that):eek:. I'll have to let the pix say the rest since I don't know much about guns. BTW, what are the rules or laws for buying guns at antique shows? And shipping them? Or taking them on a plane? Tnx! BTW I posted 4 pix but see only one in the Preview. Will post & see if the others appear. NEWBIES:rolleyes:
First of all Bgmoxie. Welcome to the forum. If you want to learn about guns, people here will help you.

2nd: You fired it? With what ammunition? Have you lost your mind? That old pistol could have blown up in your face! If you want to give it to a relative who knows nothing about firearms, is it so that you want that relative to die?

NEVER, EVER , EVER fire any firearm that is not totally safe to fire. NEVER 'just guess'. You were VERY LUCKY that the pistol didn't kill you or maim your hand.

In the condition that pistol is in, only a complete restoration would make it safe to fire and only the specific ammunition designed for it would ever be safe to fire.

I can guarantee you that the condition that pistol is in is not worth more than $50-60 RETAIL. A pawn shop might give you $10

That pistol has no real collector value unless it's a REAL cheap purchase. Parts will be non existent.

My advice is to attach it to a good fishing line as a bottom weight.

If you want to give it to a 'relative' in another state you CAN NOT TAKE IT ON AN AIRPLANE.

Send it to them registered mail to a licensed FFL dealer in their state. The FFL dealer will have your relative come in to fill out the Federal Firearms background check and they pay fee for that. If they pass the check they get the gun. Pretty simple.

Moderators. Please close this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Tnx for the info. I guess I didn't fire it! I pulled the trigger to see if it worked, but there was no ammo in it! Remember I got it at an antique fair. I live in CA.
 

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If you want to give it to a 'relative' in another state

Drop it in the mail it's a antique can ship USPS
 

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It's Belgian, and unless corroded away the ELG in an oval Liege proofmark will be on the rear cylinder face.

"Bulldog" style and missing the loading gate.

Rotation of the cylinder is only locked at moment of firing on these, or when the trigger is held back.
 

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Still would an idea on value.
Alpo and WHSmith listed value of $50 and I agree only because of the fancy grip plate's appeal.

The deep rust pits suggest it's been buried, and it's a good candidate for a gun buy-back program.
 

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I am a retired airline employee. I've read lots from people who get the jitters for transporting pistols on flights. You can go to Wally World and get a plastic pistol case and an approved TSA lock for about $25.

I don't fly anymore much, but I have a CCW, and when I do, that's how I carry my PPK and holster. In my case I have to keep the mag seperate and weapon unloaded (of course) and carry all of the ammo in a factory carton. I've NEVER had any problems, not even with TSA.

When you check your bag, TELL THEM YOU HAVE AN ANTIQUE PISTOL in a case in your luggage. A TSA Rep will come out and look at it, check to ensure it's not loaded, put it back and send you on your way. It will be checked again after it passes thru the curtains and is again X-rayed by TSA folks in the back, but you will be OK because you declared it and it was accepted. That is why you have to use a TSA approved lock - they have to be able to look at it again.

Make absolutely SURE it is not loaded. Should hold 5 shots. I'd turn the cylinder 15 times and LOOK at each and every empty chamber. Transporting a loaded weapon will get you Disneyland E Coupon worth of thrills at the airport.

Value wise, I'd agree the pistol is a $50 paper wieght. It will cost you about $75 in total to get it home, including the purchase price. It's shooting days are long over, but it looks pretty cool. Don't use it as a fishing wieght! Poor thing has had a tough go of it as it is. I wouldn't mind something like that on my wall as decoration in my den.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok tnx Jim. Why do I need to put it in a case in my luggage or get a lock, esp if everyone thinks it's non-functional? I don't know the acronyms you used (cept for TSA) since i'm not a gun person. It'll be unloaded since my intent was not to use it but to give it to a relative, unless you make me an offer i can't refuse. So what's your best offer to have this cool dude on your wall? Lots of different opinions here... It's French... It's Belgium... Take it in your luggage... Ship it... Maybe I should just go to the next antique fair & try to sell it & get my money back!
 

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You'd have to put it in a locked case in your luggage because that's what the law says. Law don't care if it works or not. Gun means "locked case".

I disagree with the "use a TSA lock". Law says "locked case that only you can get in". That means you DON'T use a TSA lock.
 

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Alpo - I stated "TSA" lock because they will open the case and inspect it. Not a matter of "if", they WILL inspect it again after it is X-rayed. I know what the law states, I'm just giving the real world version. The TSA lock just makes things easier because they have the keys to open it without damaging it. I know of instances where they have held baggage back because they couldn't get into it.

Bgmoxie - "TSA lock" I refer to is a sort of small lock that you can buy at any department store and is stamped or marked "TSA". That just means that the TSA (Security Folks) will have the ability to open the lock for inspection purposes. The code stamped on the lock tells the inspection person which key to use.

And Alpo is right - it doesn't really matter if the gun works or not to TSA. You can take my advice or leave it. I did that job for over 34 years. Personally I'd prefer NOT to give them a reason for holding my bag off.
 
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