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Pawn shop, Phenix City AL. A Mossberg 152- $10. Stock was black w/ grunge, no bluing on barrel. The old wood finish just about fell off, leaving some really pretty walnut. Buffed the barrel and browned it with Plum Brown- normally used for muzzleloaders.
Bought several guns from a pawn shop in Phenix City, Davis Sporting Goods. They had fair prices most of the time.
 

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I'll start by saying I was at an auction a few years ago which had some rifles advertised for the sale. They had a Remington Nylon 66 Black Diamond there which had a three inch hole in the stock. I bought the rifle for $35 and brought it home. I contacted Remington and sent the rifle to them knowing their was a lifetime warranty on the stock. Remington not only replaced the stock but they gave the rifle a thorough cleaning and polished the chrome finish. All it cost me was the shipping to the plant which is 100 miles from home.
It's a fun little gun to shoot and is a companion to my Mohawk Brown model 66 which also shoots well.
Hi Guys,I’m Dummy..I remember the good pawnshop days..One could buy a pristine Remington 514 for $35 bucks..
I still look but not many deals like that are found..
I miss our old America..
 

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Well..Don't throw rocks..I work for an auction house,restore antiques,ETC..If a gun we get for the auction is too much of an unsafe POC..I get first shot..I have maybe a dozen 12 gauge doubles that need work,but I'm good at that,all free..Bought 2 1890's Belgian Parlor rifles for $35.00..[Not each..] I just got 2 .22's that needed work from my buddy who closed his gun shop freebie..I lost track of how many .22's I got dirt cheap and sold..I just relined the barrel on a Remington 41P target rifle I found in a friend's cellar....
 

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Pawn shop in Boise ID had two junk .22 bolt action rifles for $50. One was an old Savage Springfield Model 53 or 56 something of that kind. It and its cheap scope were covered in rust, bore was gone, stock roughed up from the elements. It truly was a piece of junk. Second one was a Savage Sporter about 70% with the remains of a magazine jammed in the well, magazine bottom plate gone and the spring extending out into thin air. I bought #2 on the spot, brought it home and the magazine popped out with no damage. I will need only to get out a proper magazine bottom plate with the small knurled button on bottom, and solder it into place in the magazine body. Absolutely original and untouched otherwise, only showing some minor honest wear.
 

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30 plus years ago a friend asked me to fix his .22LR SAA clone that was not ejecting brass without a lot of force on the ejector rod. He had dry fired the heck out of it and every chamber in the cylinder was burred. I removed them with a fine swiss file, and advised him not to dry fire it or any other .22LR firearm. He gave me a single shot .22 rifle "for parts" and explained he had broken a cleaning rod in the bore and gouged the rifling. Visual inspection verified the middle of the bore had a small gouge in it. It was in nice shape otherwise, so I took it. It has a short LOP and I suspect it was a youth model, but fits my short reach well. A short time later, we went out to the local sand pit to shoot pistols, but I brought the .22 just to see if it worked at all. It turned out to be a tack driver, and I realized how much the crown of the barrel affects accuracy. The crown was in fine shape and shot accurately despite a gouge in the middle of the rifling.
Even now, the gun is probably worth $50.00, maybe $75.00 NIB original box, papers,etc.
So I had no problems making it my own. It had the common walnut stain over light beech,birch or ash.
I stripped the finish, fine sanded it, and my wife hand wood burned the stock for me. Lastly, I put 4 coats of tung oil, sanding between coats, then 2 more coats where I buffed them, instead of sanding. I also corrected a pin that was loose, checked and polished the mechanical parts.
So, if I don't count all my work, it was a "free" gun. I would never sell it for any money.

Tartan Air gun Wood Shotgun Plaid


Brown Wood Rectangle Art Tree
 

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My old Marlin I bought brand new for $36 & back then you could buy a brick of .22ls for $6
A few years ago when Dunham's was moving out of town I picked a Romanian M1969 military trainer for $50 & it is still the most accurate .22lr with irons I own.
All of those .22 trainers are accurate. In the gun shop I worked in, we had a WWII single shot Walther .22 that simulated the K98. the U.S. 1922 trainer patterned after the '03 Springfield, and I could have bought for $200.00 about 5 years ago, a Lee Enfield .22 trainer. Well made all, and dead accurate, fine tuned in military armories the world over.Commercial .22 rifles were also used over the years as training rifles, doubling as competition rifles in the Nationals matches at Camp Perry.
 
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