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I know mine is 154CM.. I've used a bunch. VG-10, ATS-34, M390, S-30V, 420HC....the works.
I keep coming back to 154CM for the way it holds the edge ....I... put on it.

Not the EASIEST to sharpen but not the hardest either. And the edge gets scary sharp.

This one's my latest. Very happy with it. :)

252446
 

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Got a rig that someone made out of a file. Hardest thing in the world to sharpen. Worked on it with a stone and oil for a while . Didn't ever phase it. Might have to get close to a grinder.
 

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Have a couple of knives that I made from used chrome molly power hacksaw blades. I swear you could chop a railroad tie in half with those things. Metal is so hard I could not drill holes in the tang to attach scales- used a plasma cutter to pop holes thru them.
 

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Right now 14C28M followed by 420HC. Got a CPM S110V, but I like the fore mentioned ones better. Gonna try some others one day. Maybe I'll try your 154CM.
 

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I don't know what steel this is, but I put an edge on it several months ago and it will still cut cardboard better than a razor knife. No clue where I got it from. I would call it a junk knife.
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D2 followed closely by S35VN are my favs. My knives with these steels have only ever been sharpened once with diamond stones. A periodic stropping is all they've ever needed to get scary sharp again. I like the D2 in particular since it can be left a little toothy.


Diamond stones, perhaps? I get my blades too hot sometimes with my belt sander...might be worse using a grinder. Gotta keep it cool!
Got a rig that someone made out of a file. Hardest thing in the world to sharpen. Worked on it with a stone and oil for a while . Didn't ever phase it. Might have to get close to a grinder.
 

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Through the years and countless mistakes the one thing that separated me from my 5 brothers is the ability to learn from such mistakes. I have found that each steel blade composition has its cons and pros and how and where it will be used is what will determine which knife or knives I have with me. In the jungles moisture was a problem so the type of steel I carried was more resistant to rust so I used a knife made of cobalt steel N690. Very resistant to rust and maintained a sharp edge and was easy to sharpen. I used the Extrema Ratio Kukri, my back up was a buck knife 110 folder and a Swiss army knife. Else where in the world and in the jungle, I also used a Carl Schlieper made of stainless and cold forged.
 

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I love ats-55 for a serrated knife but you can't get it anymore so cts-xhp is my go-to "decent" serrated steel. Being a work hardening steel I think ats-55 tears up the tooling too fast to keep up large scale production but holy cow those teeth get hard and sharp. Much harder than whatever the blade is tempered at. I desperately need a matriarch in ats-55 but they only made a handful.
For beater knives you can sharpen in 2 swipes I really like Kershaw's 8cr13mov. Ckrt's 8cr13mov is better and harder but takes a bit longer to sharpen. I'd rather go with a Krupp 4116, swiss army, or other fine grained German steel if I was going to sharpen and use a harder steel than Kershaw's. If I wanted much harder for a beater I would go with eafengrow Chinese d2. No idea if it's real d2 but it performs very very well. I absolutely cannot stand spyderco's vg-10. They design chippy knives and their solution is to bring the Rockwell down. No thanks. Too soft and too hard to sharpen and your edge won't last. So what if it doesn't rust, pitting is just as bad for an edge. I'd rather have a sharp knife with the tip broke off than a dull knife with a dull tip. Complete trash IMHO. I do like their zdp-189 though so I grabbed an endura in it. Heard horror stories about sharpening that stuff so I probably won't ever use it but if I need to cut through a few thousand ropes in one go I know I've got the right tool for the job.
 

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Right now 14C28M followed by 420HC. Got a CPM S110V, but I like the fore mentioned ones better. Gonna try some others one day. Maybe I'll try your 154CM.
Seconded on the 420hc if made by buck. Seems to "pop" through material instead of biting into it and it takes no time to sharpen despite being very hard. Love that steel just wish they would bring the original 290 rush back. It was a perfect knife. The new one isn't as comfortable. I miss my old blue rush dearly.
 

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Have a couple of knives that I made from used chrome molly power hacksaw blades. I swear you could chop a railroad tie in half with those things. Metal is so hard I could not drill holes in the tang to attach scales- used a plasma cutter to pop holes thru them.
About 40 years ago I made a knife out of a chunk of planer blade. Same story, I couldn't drill holes in the tang to put scales on it. I ended up wrapping the tang with black electrical tape and tossing it in my tool box and used it as a gasket scraper. Took forever to sharpen it but I only had to sharpen it once. I made a couple of fillet knives out of an old 15n20 band saw blade, scary sharp and you can bend them into a u shape and they spring right back.
 

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The knife I like the best is a 12" chef's knife I bought when I started school for restaurant managment in 1968. It's a Sabatier (French) but I have no idea what the steel alloy is. Maybe someone here knows. It is forged high carbon steel, not stainless, and will rust/ stain if not cleaned right after use. I use vegetable oil to protect the blade. Takes a fine razor edge that only needs a few passes on a butcher steel (polished surface, no tooth) to restore. Put it away in a soft case when kids were little and forgot about it for about 15 years. When I took it out, still as sharp as when it was put away. Old test from meat cutting class:
Hold a single piece of Kleenex by the corner. If you can cut strips off the free edge without tearing, it's sharp enough.
 

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I am not a Metal expert. I know from experience which brand knife I am able to put the edge I want on a knife. It Varies with my purpose for the knife. Kitchen knives are different than pocket/utility knives. I usually go with experience from the knives I have owned.
 

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My favorite knife right now is a 10" Robinson Knife Co chef knife in carbon steel. I believe this was an old company that went out of business in the early '70s. They put beautiful wood scales on their kitchen knives and when stainless became popular they made some of those along with many different utensils. But this chef knife, when sharpened, stay sharp with regular steeling for 6 months to a year and is used almost daily. I love how the carbon steel blades sharpen. You don't have to fight the chromium added to the stainless steels.

Another kitchen knife that impressed me is a Kershaw, probably from the '80s made in Japan with Swedish Sandvic 13c26, a steel developed for razor blades and surgical knives. I love the edge this knife takes and holds. it is not a true stainless but is called stain resistant. The chromium level is below true stainless and I'd bet that is partially why it sharpens so well and also hardens hard (due to other additives in the steel I imagine). This is a used knife with tiny dots where i'm sure someone failed to clean and dry the knife regularly but they are barely noticeable. I'd won a bid on a smaller version but the seller came up with some excuse that he mailed it to a wrong address and i've never seen another one.

I'm about to experimant with a Spyderco Endela with K390 steel. I've always avoided this type of steel that is so difficult to sharpen, but now that i have my diamond plates in 300,600 and 1200 along with some 1 and 1/2 micron diamond paste for leather strops, I thought I'd have a go at it. I've also bought the Spyderco ceramic stones which should help to refine the edge. They say this steel performs very well with either a toothy edge or a polished edge.

The Spyderco PM2 which I recently lost had the S30V steel. That would take a scary sharp toothy edge and hold it quite a while. It wasn't known to hold a polished edge very well.

One steel that really shouldn't impress but did me was an old Kershaw Blackout with the 2000 Snap-On blade in 440A. I'm pretty sure that was the steel it came with. Back then I was using a Lansky sharpener and that blade had a flat/squared spine for the Lansky to clamp on. Soon after, they redesigned that blade and ground sort of a v in the spot where you'd attach the clamp which I didn't care for. I also bought that same knife with G10 scales with another name and model number which had a much better steel. It's been years ago and that knife disappeared from the basement, so I'm not sure which it was. I believe they came in both 440c and 440v. From the toothy ness of that edge, I doubt it was 440c.

So far I've not tried the VG10 that Spyderco uses. Over the years I've also read of much chipping of those edges and so I tend to avoid it. Yet, many seem to love it. I wonder if they might have worked that problem out over the years.
 

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In no particular order, S35VN, old CS Carbon-5, AUS-8, 0-1, SK-5, 1095.. all are good useful steels and have served me well. That there are stainless steels in that list says a lot about how far stainless knife metallurgy has come in my life. Used to hate the stuff (but still used my old Buck knives)...


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Hold a single piece of Kleenex byOld test from meat cutting class: Hold a single piece of Kleenex by the corner. If you can cut strips off the free edge without tearing, it's sharp enough.
^^^^THIS^^^^
 
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