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Discussion Starter #1
I hand primed 600 cases last night, 380 ACP and 9mm. All cases sorted by headstamp, and mostly once reloaded with a few once fired mixed it. Using the Frankford Arsenal Perfect Prime I noticed quite a varying amount of effort required to seat primers. There were a few that I barely applied any pressure and the primer was seated. Others took a much greater effort.

At what point would you consider tossing a case due to a loose primer pocket? I’ve gleaned through my reading that as long as the primer stays in you’re good to go. But that seems a bit simplistic. Is there a primer pocket check that I’m missing?
 

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As long as the primer stays put I will use the brass.

Different brass and different primers have a different feel while seating.
E.g. with Magtech primers it's almost like you are not seating anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
As long as the primer stays put I will use the brass.

Different brass and different primers have a different feel while seating.
E.g. with Magtech primers it's almost like you are not seating anything.
In my case, I primed GFL (Fiocchi), S&B, CBC, and PMC. It was within the same headstamp that I had a concern. Between brands I might expect some slight differences, but within the same headstamp, that's what struck me as a bit odd. I generally load light to medium loads within the range, so I wouldn't expect that I was blowing the pockets open. I also do nothing to the pockets themselves...I'm either sonic cleaning or wet tumbling, so no scrapers or reamers ever touch my pistol cases.
Also, I only seated Fiocchi primers in last night's session. I'll be doing CCI and trying Tulas for the first time. I have 600 cases I'm planning to finish, then start on loading.
 

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I was loading some .30 M1 Carbine a couple of days ago. As I was seating the primer in them, I noticed that some of the primers went in without any kind of resistance. I laid those aside and when I finished priming all of them, I deprimed those and threw the brass away. If it don't feel right, then don't use them.
 

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Last year I ran into a batch of factory loaded .223 that had loose primers. I don't remember the brand at the moment, but the factory replaced the entire case after we sent back the un-fired defective ammo. The bad part was that the ammo would still fire, but the primers would fall into the action of an AR15 on ejection.
Ever try to field strip an AR when the bolt is stuck halfway back from primers wedged in the action?
I'll tell you it's NOT an easy task.
 

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So you guys are saying that they're to loose when I have to use crazy glue to hold them in? :duh:
But at least you're sealing the primers at the same time!

As far as the OP's question goes, I'm in the "If it didn't fall back out, it's good." club.
Between different production lots and stacked tolerance variations I've run into the same thing with the feel of primers seating.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Last year I ran into a batch of factory loaded .223 that had loose primers. I don't remember the brand at the moment, but the factory replaced the entire case after we sent back the un-fired defective ammo. The bad part was that the ammo would still fire, but the primers would fall into the action of an AR15 on ejection.
Ever try to field strip an AR when the bolt is stuck halfway back from primers wedged in the action?
I'll tell you it's NOT an easy task.
Had that happen on factory 300 Blackout last year. Happened maybe twice. I gritted my teeth, continued shooting. I couldn't find anything wrong with the batch, so chalked it up as a new experience of something that could happened. I was lucky, the primer fell down into the lower.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Did you ever read a post and think..."I'm an idiot."?
I bought these gauges to verify that I'd swaged my crimped 300 Blackout (or conversion) cases after I'd set off a primer on a "not quite swaged enough" case.

Call me an idiot...of course...small primer is small primer. If it works for my .223/.300 cases it'll surely work on my pistol cases.

Thanks for the smack upside the head...I needed that.
 

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If a primer doesn't seat with any resistance I toss the case. The worst culprit for loose primers was back when I started reloading 7.63X39. I bought a hundred new Winchester cases and loaded up a bunch to mid-range specs with IMR-4227 and 125 grain FMJs. That data from my Lyman manual - but the powder was too hot for that load. Blew a few primers from the cases on firing (the ones that didn't blow out were flat and cratered). The cases that blew out the primers had loose primer pockets - and I tossed all of those. I've since switched to BLC (2) and found a decent load for that caliber.
 
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