which one ?

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by oscarmayer, Apr 16, 2009.

  1. oscarmayer

    oscarmayer New Member

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    bewteen the webley & scott and the enfield top break (38) both being of WWII vintage which one is better ? always wanted a WWII vintage top break and now i have a chance to pick either or . the condition is a honest 90% on both so which one would you go with and why ?
     
  2. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Either will do, they were both made to the same pattern and standard. Keep in mind some of the Enfields were made double action only, no hammer spur. Meant for tank troops where a spur would catch on things.

    The Webleys were made by Webley in the factory in Birmingham, the Enfields were made by a government factory, in Enfield among other places.

    If it were me, I would go Enfield, but only one with double action.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 16, 2009

  3. oscarmayer

    oscarmayer New Member

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    thank you for the reply i was leaning towards the enfield i like the double action only set up.
     
  4. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Be aware, its long and heavy, though the revolver should come with specific grips, with a flared top for a better hold. They were quite ahead of their time in many ways, though should have gone semi auto by then.
     
  5. Oneida Steve

    Oneida Steve Well-Known Member

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    To each his own. I would go just the opposite way. I would take the Webley over the Enfield.

    I don't like DA-only revolvers. I prefer the Webley with the hammer spur.
     
  6. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking that, with two companies, one that has as its only customer the government, and the other that actually has to make a living selling to the civilian market, that I would buy the civilian gun.

    Let's suppose, for a moment, that a civilian gun maker put a million rifles on the market that were badly heat-treated, and were likely to blow up in your face. Would they still be in business? Between the lawsuits and the, "Screw that widow-maker gun, I'm gonna buy a Winchester", they'd go belly-up. But, in the late oughts/early teens of the 20th Century, Springfield Armory did just that. Government said, "Change how you do that", and they went right on making guns, and the dangerous guns are still out there. Everyone knows that you should not shoot "low-numbered Springfields".

    So, if I had a choice between a Springfield or a Colt 1911, or a Springfield or Remington 1903 A3, or a Springfield or H&R Garand, I'd pick the one that was made by a gun company that had to do it right or go bankrupt.

    By the same reasoning, I'd pick Webley over Enfield.
     
  7. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Well I have seen and fired many of both, and there's no real difference. They are actually very pleasant revolvers to shoot, the cartridge being quite gentle on recoil.

    As I am sure you know, they eject all six cases when you open it, making a partial reload a pain (Not unlike the Garrand that you couldn't top up) if you get one I shall tell you a little trick for opening it without the ejector working.
     
  8. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    Will your little trick work on the Webley Mark VI? That would be kinda nice to know.
     
  9. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Yes, forward part of the hinge, front lower frame you will notice a ally coloured ring, open it slowly while watching and you will see it push against the blue frame, thats what is pushing the extractor up. So press the opening lever and as you start to open the gun press in on the edge of the ally bit so it goes over the frame. It will go in.

    This has proved way more complicated to explain than it is. Just press on the hinge from the front as you open the gun...It will open without the extractor working.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 18, 2009
  10. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    Yep. Works. Thanks.

    Oh, and as for that, "more complicated to explain than to do", been there, done that, many many times. :D

    Oh yes, and I don't mind you putting that U in color :p, but you can't be leavin' the O out of alloy. Changes the word, don't ya know.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2009