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I want to buy a high quality reload set up that will cover .308, .357, .45, and .22 but I know nothing about them. I have about $400 to $500 I can drop on this, what would you guys recommend?

Thanks!
 

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For that price range, you can get an excellent turret press with all the needed accessories from Lyman or RCBS. That's the way I would point you. You're just a little short of being able to get all you need with a progressive setup from Dillon or Hornady.

Here is what you need (and the "kits" don't typically contain every piece):
  1. Press
  2. Dies (for each different cartridge you want to load)
  3. Components - bullets, primers, powder
  4. Calipers (dial or digital)
  5. Case Trimmer
  6. Tumbler
  7. Scale (digital or beam... but I sure like digital)
  8. Powder Measure (not strictly necessary, but it's really handy)

Sidebar: You listed ".22" as a caliber you'd like to reload. If you're talking rimfire rounds, just forget it. They're too cheap to bother with reloading, and they use a different type of priming system that makes them a pain in the butt to do anyway. I've seen Youtube vids of people doing it, but it doesn't make sense while a commercial supply is still available.
 

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above, plus personally, I always advocate to start off with a good single stage press such as RCBS rockchucker or similar. A good turret press is also easy to understand for someone starting off.

Dillon is the king of progressive presses but I would strongly encourage to start with a simple press until you fully understand the whole process in separate steps.

Welcome to TFF!
 

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You guys think this one would be good start? High quality, versatile, got most of what I need to start?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hornady-Lock-N-Load-Classic-Reloading-Kit-085003-/120987375005?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1c2b68d59d
Sure, if you want.

Single stage means that you will be handling each piece of brass at least 3 times before it's loaded. A turret means you only have to handle each piece once.

Single stage presses are slow. That's some people's preference, but it's not what I would advise.
 

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You guys think this one would be good start? High quality, versatile, got most of what I need to start?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hornady-Lock-N-Load-Classic-Reloading-Kit-085003-/120987375005?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1c2b68d59d
Radio Bob, this is my opinion. I have the Hornady single stage kit that you are inquiring about. You get free bullets with it when you buy it (mail order, you pay postage) and it has the interchangeable quick die change out. My kit is great. The powder measure is as accurate as any other on the market, the scale is accurate, and the press is stout and as smooth as butter. It mounts easy.

It is wise to have a single stage press to start out with because you learn the basic fundamentals of reloading. Then, once you know you like it you can always step up into a progressive. It is always good to have a single stage press even if you have a progressive because if you break a part or lose a spring from your progressive you can switch to the single stage. I hope I made sense.

I have no regrets about buying my Hornady single stage press, none at all.
 
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