Who Bakes Bread?

Discussion in 'Ruffit's Domestic & Wild Game Cooking/ Recipe Foru' started by zant, Jan 20, 2020.

  1. CS4570

    CS4570 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2020
    Messages:
    109
    Location:
    NC
    I tries several times to make a sourdough starter with mixed results.
    but found this one:
    Wild Grape Starter


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    Recipe By:Sharon

    "Use unwashed, organically grown red or purple grapes for this recipe. The white powder found on the skins of the grapes is yeast. If you wish, you can switch to bread flour on the 5th day. The starter is fully active and ready to use in 9 days."

    Ingredients
    • 1 pound grapes
    • 1 cup whole wheat flour
    Directions
    1. Stem grapes into a medium mixing bowl. Crush with hands. Cover with cheesecloth, and set aside for three days at room temperature.
    2. After three days there should be bubbles in the grape juice, indicating fermentation has begun. Strain liquid, and discard skins. Return to bowl, and stir in 1 cup whole wheat flour. Set aside for 24 hours at room temperature.
    3. Measure 1 cup starter, discard any extra, and transfer to a 1 quart glass or ceramic container with a lid. Stir in 1 scant cup bread flour and 1 cup water. The mixture should resemble a thick batter; add more water or flour if necessary to achieve this consistency. Cover loosely with lid. Let stand at room temperature for 24 hours. Repeat the following day. Some activity should be noticeable: the mixture should be starting to bubble. Repeat twice more. You will need to discard some of the mixture each day.
    4. Starter should be quite active. Begin feeding regularly, every 4 to 6 hours, doubling the starter each time. For instance, if you have 1 cup starter, add 1 cup bread flour and 1 cup water. Alternatively, store in the refrigerator, and feed weekly.
    https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/7.../?recipeType=Recipe&servings=1&isMetric=false

    It works really well, but I hate throwing out starter every time I feed it.
    I found a no waste method on a web site called, Bake with Jack. He is English and has a you tube channel.
    There is a lot of info on all aspects of bread baking.
    Here is the link to the video of no waste starter
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2020
    jbmid1 and rawright54 like this.
  2. Danwin22

    Danwin22 Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    309
    Location:
    longwood, Florida
    I don’t bake but I can still remember when I was a little kid in the 1940’s, walking into my grandmothers’ farm house kitchen and smelling the aroma of bread she was baking in her cast iron coal stove.

    Then she would cut off a slab for me and lather it up with freshly churned home-made butter.

    That smell of bread is imprinted on my memory.
     
    Rae Harrison, joe45c and howlnmad like this.