The Firearms Forum banner
1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
NO not a flame posting.
but looking for real input from owners of many presses.

i am looking to invest in a new progressive press. but what are the good and bad of the varied brands. sure they all work good and about the same. but how is the cost of parts? as in the turrets, set up. adding stuff. workability's of them.
why this model over another. i am cheap so last years is good enough, or is it?

if you say the blue is better then the red. go away. i want real working information. cost per usability etc. versatility, stuff like that.
i have a rcbs rock chucker with a piggyback on it. along with some light duty stuff for "other" jobs.
not into doing 50,000 rounds a month, but will be working with at least 10 different loadings. (i have more than a couple mouths to feed).


.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
43,878 Posts
The first progressive press I ever bought was a Lee LoadMaster. Every part of it except the "frame" was made of plastic. Primer feeder, bullet feeder, brass feeder- all plastic. Every time I sat down to load some ammo, something would break, which would put a halt until I could replace that part. I started keeping extra parts for everything. I got so tired of thing breaking or distorting out of its original shape that I finally got rid of the thing. That experience almost made me NOT go with another progressive press.

After a while, I thought would try again so I started doing a little research on progressive presses. I saw all of these videos on you tube telling how to fix things or to "tweek" things on the Hornady LnL presses to make them work better. Hellfire, I had gotten rid of another press that had to be fixed all the time. Why would I want to get another one with all the same (or different) problems. BTW, Hornady is also Red!

I never saw anyone complaining about Dillon presses. There are videos of Dillon on you tube, but I don't recall every seeing one on how to fix or tweek a Dillon progressive press. I bought a Dillon and can't be any happier. Yes, Dillon costs more, but you get what you pay for, or so that is what I have always heard! I have had it four or five years so far and I have not had to replace any part of it and it worked perfectly right out of the box

That is why I know that Blue is better than Red!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,577 Posts
The red is a pain to setup. The instructions are poorly written so you have to watch utube to see how its done.
Yes it is cheaper than the others and you have to tinker with it to get it just right.
Once you understand every element of it then it becomes a great press.
I have one and also others. The red one I have is used only for handgun cartridges . I use the others for rifle. But that's just me.
I can crank out several thousand in a week end.
The one BIG flaw with this unit is that it is VERY fussy about the condtion of the cartridge rims. Also if all the parts are not alighned properly ,you will end up with broken parts. (had mine for four years and no broken parts so far)
Remember, if you are not mechanicaly inclined , don't buy it.

I have known people who have owned one for years and have never set it up properly. After a while, they just throw it out and buy a more user friendly press.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,556 Posts
You are cheap (as am I) and you already have a Rock Chucker, why spend money on a progressive unless you are shooting 100's of rounds a week?
I have been using the same single station press for 25 years and have no plans on replacing it. BTW, I shoot about 200 rounds a week and don't see any reason to spend the money on a progressive press.
My press has paid for itself many times over, you will have to shoot a lot to get that progressive to pay for itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i have a piggy back on my rock chucker. it can jam or just be fickel.

i like not having to change tooling for each stage.
yes been looking at a dillon but the cost ( nothing found used).
i like the fact one can set the fies in a tool head, basic set and forget.
( yes slight adj as needed).
but mostly was hoping for less finicky problems in a purpose built unit.
the dillon 550 has four stages and the 650 has five.
as in i do some parts off the press as stand alone deals
aka: decapping on a very cheap lee press.
hand held unit for repriming.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
NO not a flame posting.
but looking for real input from owners of many presses.

i am looking to invest in a new progressive press. but what are the good and bad of the varied brands. sure they all work good and about the same. but how is the cost of parts? as in the turrets, set up. adding stuff. workability's of them.
why this model over another. i am cheap so last years is good enough, or is it?

if you say the blue is better then the red. go away. i want real working information. cost per usability etc. versatility, stuff like that.
i have a rcbs rock chucker with a piggyback on it. along with some light duty stuff for "other" jobs.
not into doing 50,000 rounds a month, but will be working with at least 10 different loadings. (i have more than a couple mouths to feed).

.
If you care to take the time to research, everything is on the web that you could ever need to know about them.
I spent several years off and on acquiring the knowledge about every type even homemade presses. I didn't even need to ask the questions that had already been asked and answered a million times. That is why I came to the conclusion that if you can afford the best progressive press for a home reloading room, the Dillion is the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you care to take the time to research, everything is on the web that you could ever need to know about them.
I spent several years off and on acquiring the knowledge about every type even homemade presses. I didn't even need to ask the questions that had already been asked and answered a million times. That is why I came to the conclusion that if you can afford the best progressive press for a home reloading room, the Dillion is the best.
researching is what i am doing,
just not good with all this computer stuff.
i can search all week long and not find a thing.
a base dillon deal it $700.usd
by the time it is ready one can be well over a grand.
but not sure if i need such a high speed unit.
and no ad is going to say the problems or qurks of there product.
but i do agree can not go wrong with a dillon, just need more cash,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,238 Posts
You are cheap (as am I) and you already have a Rock Chucker, why spend money on a progressive unless you are shooting 100's of rounds a week?
I have been using the same single station press for 25 years and have no plans on replacing it. BTW, I shoot about 200 rounds a week and don't see any reason to spend the money on a progressive press.
My press has paid for itself many times over, you will have to shoot a lot to get that progressive to pay for itself.
Gots to agree with what you just said. I'm into my 35th year of reloading and have always done mine on a single stage press. I started off with a Pacific C-frame, then went to a RCBS Rock Chucker, then on to a Pacific 007, and finally to the Redding Boss that I've had for about 10 yrs. now. Of the people that I know that reload on progressives, I've never heard anyone say anything derogatory about a Dillon. The others, not always the case. Several times I've came close to ordering a Dillon, but I always have a "cheap attack". In addition to the Redding press, I also have a B-Square arbor press to use my Wilson dies.
 

·
Philogynist & Sycophant, Looking For Work
Joined
·
7,505 Posts
Why a progressive press? I can certainly understand that changing setups for a single stage can be a pain, but I have a RCBS turret model that eliminates that for a fairly low cost solution. I reload several cartridges, and simply swap turrets to change. About the only adjustment I do is when I change bullets - the seating die needs to be reset. Turrets are pricy, at about $60 each, but I sometimes find them on sale, and each can carry dies for two cartridges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Why a progressive press? I can certainly understand that changing setups for a single stage can be a pain, but I have a RCBS turret model that eliminates that for a fairly low cost solution. I reload several cartridges, and simply swap turrets to change. About the only adjustment I do is when I change bullets - the seating die needs to be reset. Turrets are pricy, at about $60 each, but I sometimes find them on sale, and each can carry dies for two cartridges.
never even knew rcbs has a turret
shows how much i need to learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,277 Posts
Blue IS better than red, so I will just go away!
same here Blue is better than red

reasons:

Reds primer feed system is unreliable, Blue is good, reliable and easy to refill magazines make adding primers a snap when loading

Blue is a more precise machine, superior design, when set up as required it just works without fail. Red requires tinkering with and adjusting.

Blue powder drop is also very precise and extremely consistent.
Red, disk system is ok, but not consistent

The Dillon 550 is an extremely versitle press able to load a multitude of calibers with their quick change out it makes it fast to switch from one caliber or primer size

The Dillon cost more, but if you keep it and decide to sell it, you will get more of your money back verses a Lee, Dillon holds their value better

Buy once...cry once...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,381 Posts
Yep, I have a Lee Classic turret AND a Dillon 550B, and I use both. Did I need the Dillon?, Nope, but the kids made it a great Father's Day gift a couple years back so I HAVE to use it, tsk, tsk....Having said all that, the Lee turret is a fine unit, loaded scads of pistol rounds on it, and it would still be my prime mover except I HAVE to use the Dillon, 'cause it was a gift...poor me.

I believe you would be well served with a Lee Classic turret on your bench, not a wallet breaker, and IT WORKS!
 

·
TFF Chaplain
Joined
·
21,614 Posts
I went with Green, mostly because a used one came up when I was looking for one. That RCBS progressive is good, reliable. I use it for all three calibers I reload (pistol caliber and .223 and .243). I use Lee dies for the rifle calibers; RCBS dies for the pistol caliber.

If I had had the money at the time I might have gone with the Dillon. Several of my friends have Dillons and they put them to good use.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dbcooper

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,594 Posts
Yep, I have a Lee Classic turret AND a Dillon 550B, and I use both. Did I need the Dillon?, Nope, but the kids made it a great Father's Day gift a couple years back so I HAVE to use it, tsk, tsk....Having said all that, the Lee turret is a fine unit, loaded scads of pistol rounds on it, and it would still be my prime mover except I HAVE to use the Dillon, 'cause it was a gift...poor me.

I believe you would be well served with a Lee Classic turret on your bench, not a wallet breaker, and IT WORKS!
First thing I did on mine was remove the indexing rod. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,594 Posts
I have a
I leave that piece installed, mainly because I still have a RockChucker on a stand nearby...
RC next to mine too, I just like to batch things. I use my turret like a SS but with fast change over.

IE.. resize a batch, click the tool head over, seat a batch, click the head over, crimp a batch..e tc.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top