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The line around the cylinder and the little nicks out of the notches where the cylinder stop stop in gaged the cylinder. I'm afraid this is going to be a problem on this asm copy of a 51 navy in .44 cal I bought this gun unfired this damage is after only about 300 rounds thru it. What is it? Is it going to be problems after a few thousand shots or is it just breaking in.
 

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Could be soft steel. Nt ncssarily week, just not hardned as well as it should be. Youmay find a gun smith who will heat treat it to a brinell hardness closer to what you'll find on a colt
 

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I would keep using it until it no longer functioned properly. Then trash it, and buy what you want by a good brand. There was never an 1851 Navy in .44 cal.
 

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ASM wasn't high on quality. The drag line is most likely caused by letting the hammer down from half cock and then the cylinder turning until it locks into place. You should always pull the hammer back to full cock and let it down from there. The peening around the bolt notch is caused from the bolt coming up a little too late. You can spread the bolt leg or close it up where it rides on the hammer cam and correct that(I don't remember which way works for that). The bolt should pop up into the lead in, not directly into the notch.
 

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This is one of the most informational "reads" that I found when I was cruising around the internet looking for info on how to get the timing set right on an un-named .44 caliber Navy revolver that I picked up broken. And yes, I know it's a replica, big whoops, it still goes bang and works fine so hush up the gun snob BS...

http://www.theopenrange.net/articles/Tuning_the_Pietta_Part_One.pdf

http://www.theopenrange.net/articles/Tuning_the_Pietta_Part_Two.pdf

It pretty much applies to all of the BP revolvers since they are the same design with only small differences.
 

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This is one of the most informational "reads" that I found when I was cruising around the internet looking for info on how to get the timing set right on an un-named .44 caliber Navy revolver that I picked up broken. And yes, I know it's a replica, big whoops, it still goes bang and works fine so hush up the gun snob BS...

http://www.theopenrange.net/articles/Tuning_the_Pietta_Part_One.pdf

http://www.theopenrange.net/articles/Tuning_the_Pietta_Part_Two.pdf

It pretty much applies to all of the BP revolvers since they are the same design with only small differences.
Good tune tips. I don't have one of these guns but will be getting one soon. I saved the articles for when I do. Thanks.
 

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This is one of the most informational "reads" that I found when I was cruising around the internet looking for info on how to get the timing set right on an un-named .44 caliber Navy revolver that I picked up broken. And yes, I know it's a replica, big whoops, it still goes bang and works fine so hush up the gun snob BS...

http://www.theopenrange.net/articles/Tuning_the_Pietta_Part_One.pdf

http://www.theopenrange.net/articles/Tuning_the_Pietta_Part_Two.pdf

It pretty much applies to all of the BP revolvers since they are the same design with only small differences.
Yep, good information. I have the 1858 New Army. I really like the weapon but some times the cylinder will miss the mark and not line up. Not very often. I think it does it more if its too clean. Now I don't strip it down to the bare bones every time I clean. Every other cleaning I'll take all parts off the frame. Only barrel and cylinder get super scrubbed each time. Maybe I'm wrong but its working so far.

Tom
 
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