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I bought this new, but have used it to shoot a coyote. Left side of barrel: Winchester Made in USA 30-30 On right side of barrel: Buffalo Bill Commemorative. On back strap: WF Cody Chief of Scouts. Ser # WC73697. It has a small chip of wood gone from stock near but plate where I dropped it and lost the piece. Wood Door Wood stain Hardwood Gas
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If you are looking for a value it would be as a shooter . Commeratives only bring extra money in pristine, never fired,in the box with all paperwork condition . Expect $800 to $1000 would be realistic
 

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I used to sell a lot of commemoratives in my shop.
All it takes is to fire it once, and the value drops like a rock.
Most of the time a used commemorative is worth less than a non-commemorative.
If you have the box, all the paper work and never fired, then you could realize $800 depending on the condition of the original box. Yes, the original shipping box has a lot to do with the value.
All most all commemorative firearms are a poor investment. Only two commemorative rifles have ever gained any real value.
That would be the John Wayne and the Boy Scouts with the box, ammo, ect.

Now in Europe it is just the opposite. A 1957? Commemorative Luger just sold for $27,000. ( it was plain Jane with almost no engraving)
 

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I have a feeling that commemorative guns are made out of guns that can't be sold as functioning guns, let me explain why.

I bought a "used" commemorative M1 Garand a few years ago. Since it looked like it had been beating around in someone's trunk for years, I decided that I would shoot it. It would not accept an En bloc clip, and I tried several. I did shoot it as a single shot! I sent the rifle to a man who worked as a "Garand gunsmith" at the CMP in Anniston, AL to see if it could be fixed. He told me that the receiver was so far out of specs that it would never be able to be repaired and that the barrel had been polished to the point that it was barely being held by the receiver, and that the gun was unsafe to fire.

I removed all of the gold accents from the rifle and sold them on eBay and made more than what I paid for the rifle. I cut off the end of the receiver so it could never be built into a rifle again. I still have it laying here on my desk with the bolt and trigger mechanism.

Air gun Trigger Wood Revolver Gun barrel
 

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Commemorative guns must be made in limited amounts, 1,000 or less, to appreciate if any.
I have a few 9422's that have went way up in value, some are very limited in number, low serial numbers, some commemorative.
Remember there is a limited market for them to.
Very rare one of a kind are hard to value and even harder to sell.
 

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There is a gun store about 30 miles from here and they have a lot of used rifles. They always seem to have a few Winchester 94 commemorative rifles. Sometimes they are cheaper than a standard 94. They had an Illinois commemorative and I was tempted to buy it.
 
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I have a feeling that commemorative guns are made out of guns that can't be sold as functioning guns,
This might be true in some cases however with regard to Winchester Commemoratives I believe most were possibly not given final tuning or adjustments and probably just test fired and sent on their way, never expecting them to be fired.

An example is one I own, a '66 100 year Commemorative Winchester Mod 94 that would not properly cycle and the lever would not completely release the trigger safety pin when I first got it.

It turned out the lever had never been adjusted to meet the bottom tang level when closed and the carrier spring had not been finish fitted to properly time with cycling. Also I discovered the gold wash on the receiver had excess 'flashing' left on the internal edges of the receiver.

After accomplishing these two adjustments and removing the excess flashing, it now cycles flawlessly and is my most accurate Mod 94.

Another Commemorative Mod 94 I own (ironically a Buffalo Bill as well) cycled and operated ok when I first got it but it too took some fine tuning to get it to match the '66 in smoothness and reliability.

The '66 Comem next to an 'original' 1899 Klondike Sporting RIfle.
Wood Plant Trunk Garden tool Tool
 

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Kinda like what I said about it not being finished enough to be turned into a functioning gun.
 

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Kinda like what I said about it not being finished enough to be turned into a functioning gun.
In the case of the '66 it was just left with some final fitting left unaccomplished and the gold flashing not cleaned off.

Otherwise after I cleaned it off the internal edges it was a very nicely finished receiver and all the parts fit properly and functioned smoothly.

I suspect there was no difference between the 'stock' receivers and those used to make the commemoratives at the time. The downside is as I shoot the '66 Commemorative more I am seeing the gold wash beginning to wear off the edges of the receiver and around the loading gate but such is life - I bought it as a shooter !
 

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I have a feeling that commemorative guns are made out of guns that can't be sold as functioning guns, let me explain why.

I bought a "used" commemorative M1 Garand a few years ago. Since it looked like it had been beating around in someone's trunk for years, I decided that I would shoot it. It would not accept an En bloc clip, and I tried several. I did shoot it as a single shot! I sent the rifle to a man who worked as a "Garand gunsmith" at the CMP in Anniston, AL to see if it could be fixed. He told me that the receiver was so far out of specs that it would never be able to be repaired and that the barrel had been polished to the point that it was barely being held by the receiver, and that the gun was unsafe to fire.

I removed all of the gold accents from the rifle and sold them on eBay and made more than what I paid for the rifle. I cut off the end of the receiver so it could never be built into a rifle again. I still have it laying here on my desk with the bolt and trigger mechanism.

View attachment 266225
I would have taken it to another gunsmith or machine shop and had it fixed I'm Shure it would have been possible I have seen welded together nasty looking garands fixed by the machine shop I use.
 

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I have a Buffalo Bill Commemorative and it is one fine hog gun. Shoulders better than my other model 94. Don
 
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My wife's sister retired from Olin. While working there she bought several of the commemorative winchesters with her company discount. I don't know how many she has but none have ever been fired.
 

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They always seem to have a few Winchester 94 commemorative rifles. Sometimes they are cheaper than a standard 94.
This is true as I have seen it myself.

Actually in the last several years I have been seeing more commemoratives coming up for sale privately, at shows and LGSs and oftentimes less than a comparable standard Mod 94 carbine.

26" Commemoratives are probably the least expensive due to the barrel length and probably the lowest priced one I have ever see is the Canadian Centennial version. Actually this one is probably one of the better Commemoratives to own as it is not overly gaudy with engraving and Canadian symbols. Just some maple leaves and branches on the receiver and a gold washed inscription on the barrel near the sight that could be filled with black paint if one really wanted to conceal it but it wouldn't be necessary.

Personally I wish my '66 100 year commemorative didn't have the gold washed receiver and other metal parts and was just Du-lite blued or black chrome plated like others were in the time frame.

Bottom line is a Commemorative might be a good alternative for someone looking for not only a Mod 94, but a good deal and in a 26" it's about the only alternative.
 
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