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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Rifle has been thoroughly cleaned, brand new firing pin, using .308 ammo from PPC .
Still preforms like a single shot, the hammer does catch the sear, so that's not it. Have to pull back the action about one inch and let it slam forward, then it will fire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
after reading more info on this and careful examination , I have determined the problem is with the trigger lock. Winchester says to remove the trigger lock if it's not working properly,
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
correct, I now have the new firing pin, I removed the trigger block components, but now the trigger still holds onto the hammer. Last thing I want to do is to modify the trigger/hammer/sear.
The trigger block prevents what they call "doubling", not sure what that is, unless it's a fancy name for " full-auto"
 

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It is not uncommon for a poorly done trigger job to result in "doubling". That is one trigger pull and two firings (or sometimes more, up to emptying the magazine..Full Auto). The BATF takes a dim view of any person in possession of a gun that gives more than one firing from a single pull of the trigger. They will and have prosecuted people for possessing such a gun even when the gun was made that way by accident or through broken parts.

I do not know your gun well enough to comment on how to fix it. If it is not intuitively obvious what is broken and you have reached the limit of you abilities to fix it then be smart and take it to a good gunsmith. If you turn it into a "doubler" you could get in a heap of trouble. Anyone in your area when it doubles just might report you and the BbATF absolutely loves to prosecute otherwise law abiding people because they are easy to find, unlike real criminals.

LDBennett
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
the only thing wrong is you have to pull the action back about one inch in order to unlock the trigger lock. Aside from this the rifle preforms perfectly . It's just acting like a single shot.
I'm interested in selling
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
UPDATE, Winchester sent me the new firing pin PLUS a d $30.00 check for my troubles, but it still wasn't functioning properly, so I removed the recoil block, took it to the belt sander and removed a tiny bit off the bottom, now the slide assembly fits snugly and tighter than before, now the trigger block disengages like it should.
The rifle now fires perfectly and is now a great shooter, I'm going to scope it and see what it does out on the range.
 

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I have this same gun and a gunsmith is currently working on it trying to get it back into operating condition. He said that it appears to be missing the trigger disconnect and the disconnect spring and when the trigger is pulled it is not catching the bolt when it comes back. I have tried downloading some exploded diagrams online but they did not have sufficient detail. Does anyone have a clear diagram of the trigger assembly showing the parts and numbers so I can try and find them online? Thank you.

Steve, do you still have this diagram and is it possible for me to get a copy? I am trying to find the part numbers for the trigger disconnect and disconnect spring but am having difficulty finding a detailed diagram showing these parts. THank You.
 

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This thread is almost 4yrs old, "Steve" is not a member here, and sadly passed away several years ago. The link to his website is still good, but to see it, you have to contact the new owner, and pay a membership fee now.
Does this help?:
 

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From LeRoy's ramblings-
The following is Wisner's rendition & info on the subject.
The difference in the old firing pin and the new one is as follows. The old replaced style, was totally lathe tuned (round). While the new recall style is similar in lathe turning on the front and back, but in the front midsection it has two flats milled, one on each side. This makes the center section stronger. Also replaced is the bolt sleeve lock pin (firing pin guide) which was made to accommodate this different shaped firing pin
Part number for the new parts are, firing pin =1391ND, bolt sleeve locking pin =1491ND
The word was at the time this recall was in process was that if the firing pin would break at the mid section and still remain in the gun as two pieces, the possibility of a premature discharge before the bolt was locked was possible. This apparently was caused by the firing pin tip (now not having the benefit of the retracting spring) to be stuck forward, and thereby slam-firing the cartridge upon chambering.
The responsibility for the recall apparently was on Olin, as they were the parent company AT THE TIME manufacture. Olin set up regional recall centers at three established US gunshops. There was a manufacturing delay in the replacement firing pins, and a BACKLOG occurred, also some collectors did not like the idea of shipping their guns long distances. Olin then also authorized other warranty gunshops to make the required alterations. Upon completion of the recall, the shops were to test fire the firearm and to stamp an assigned letter on the inside top of the receiver as seen thru the magazine well with the bolt retracted. The letter “B” represented Bolsa Gunsmithing, “L” was Lefever, and “N” was for Nu-line Guns. The letter “X” apparently was for all the other authorized shops. However this identification information did not get communicated to some of the smaller shops at the start of the project. Therefore, the only way to tell if the gun as been modified, if the ”letter” is not present, is to take the barrel & action out of the stock, remove the trigger guard assembly and the try to rotate the firing pin by twisting it. If it does rotate, then the firing pin recall HAS NOT been performed.

 

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I personally love my Mod.100. I still think it's one of the nicest looking and most elegant commercial semi's out there. I've had several pass through my hands until I found my "keeper". The seller told me that his uncle bought it in 1964, put one box of shells through it, cleaned it, and put it away so for all intents and purposes, I bought a new old rifle. It came with the lovely, but flimsier, basket weave oak motif stock. I swapped it out for a beefier checkered stock, put on a recoil pad to accommodate my length of pull, had the firing pin upgrade done, and started load development. I have several .308 bolt rifles and this is my only semi deer rifle and it loves 150 gr. Hornady (#3031) on top of 45 gr. of Accurate 2495. I went through a lot of ammo, both commercial and handloads, and I found it very picky on ammo. I'm told that Winchester stopped production because it became too expensive to produce and couldn't compete with the Remington and Browning line of semis. I've heard complaints about how complex it is to take apart but my own experience is if you're tool handy and careful, it's not a big deal.
 

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